Topic

Women's Rights

450 petitions

Update posted 17 hours ago

Petition to U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment

A Petition to be delivered to all U.S. Senators, all Members of the U.S. House of Representatives, and to all State lawmakers  Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment NOW Are you aware that Women’s Rights are not in the U.S. Constitution? Ask around. Many people mistakenly believe Women’s Rights are already in the U.S. Constitution. They’re not. Wait. What? They’re not? They’re not. The U.S. Constitution gives Women only one right –the right to vote. It’s time to amend the Constitution to guarantee women all the rights men have… not just the one right to vote. Fellow students and others, it’s time for us to finally convince elected U.S. and State lawmakers to pass and ratify the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). It’s so overdue.  What can you do?  Sign this petition if you support adding the ERA to the U.S. Constitution.  Sign this petition if you want to help lawmakers Pass and Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment.  Sign this petition to accept the torch from those who came before us, giants on whose shoulders we stand. Let’s take the Equal Rights Movement up to the next level – ratification. Let’s take the torch from those who lit it and those who carried it such as: Alice Paul and Crystal Eastman; U.S. Representative Bella Abzug of New York and feminists Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, Bobbie Francis; Eleanor Roosevelt; Lucy Stone, Senator Ted Kennedy, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Senator Patsy Mink, Jeannette Rankin, Billie Jean King, Shirley Chisholm et al.  It’s our turn now. Be among the next wave of Equal Rights Activists. Sign, then spread the word. Then ask your U.S. and State lawmakers where they stand on the ERA. Ask them to sign, too. Be one of the reinforcements. Help make women’s rights official and Constitutional.

The Yellow Roses ERA
632 supporters
Update posted 4 days ago

Petition to Yoweri Museveni Kaguta

Urge Ugandan President Museveni to pass the acid attack bill now.

After having lived for seven years with an abusive husband, I decided it was time to leave. I didn’t think I would survive another year if I stayed, so in 2011, I walked out the door and broke the crippling silence and isolation the abuse had made me feel. I felt empowered and free and finally looked forward to my future. But because I left my marriage, my husband considered me “disobedient” and, therefore, worthy of punishment. One day, he called me to pick up my children at his house and suddenly acid was thrown at my face and body. The next thing I knew, my face felt as if it were on fire. My skin was  literally melting away. He thought he would break my spirit, but he only made me stronger. Since my attack, I have been fighting to put an end to this horrific practice in my country of Uganda, and I need your help to do it. Please support our petition by asking H.E. President Yoweri Museveni Kaguta to sign the Toxic Chemicals Bill into law. That is my story, but there are many more, each one as harrowing as the last. Acid violence occurs around the globe and isn’t specific to race or religion. My country, Uganda, has some of the highest rates of acid violence. In fact, since 1985, there have been nearly 400 reported cases of acid attacks here, and in just one hospital alone, they have reported 8 attacks and two deaths this year.  And those are just the ones that were reported. The real statistics are likely much higher. My name is Hanifa Nakiryowa, and my fellow acid attack survivor Gloria Kankunda and I have founded the Center for Rehabilitation of Survivors of Acid and burns Violence (CERESAV). We founded CERESAV because of our personal experiences, and because of the stories we were told by fellow victims. CERESAV’s ultimate goal is to address the issue of acid attacks and gender violence on a global level, but today we have a chance to make a difference in Uganda by helping to pass legislation that would classify products like acid as controlled substances. Cutting off easy access to acid has proven to  drastically reduce the rate of attacks in other countries.   Research indicates that the most effective ways to reduce acid violence are through regulation of the sale of acid, tougher jail sentences for perpetrators, and raising awareness of the devastating impact that acid attacks have on individuals and their families. Step by step, CERESAV hopes to make all of these things a reality, but we can’t do it alone.   With collective efforts, we can end this devastating act and save the next potential victim. I know we can make a difference. When strong women and fellow victims of female-directed violence, like Jaha who fought to end female genital mutilation, or Malala who is a champion for girls’ education started Change.org petitions, great things happened. Please join me in asking H.E. President Yoweri Museveni Kaguta to sign the Toxic Chemicals Bill into law.

Hanifa Nakiryowa
281,900 supporters
Update posted 6 days ago

Petition to North Carolina State Senate, North Carolina State House, NC Senator Jeff Jackson

Change Outdated NC Law That Does Not Allow Consent to be Withdrawn After Sex Begins

Late last year, my estranged husband brutally raped me. When he came to my house -- angry and belligerent -- I initially consented to having sex with him because I thought it was safest to say yes. But he grew more and more violent, and I became more and more scared and uncomfortable. I begged and pleaded for him to stop, but he refused. He attacked me for more than an hour and a half. It was horrific, and no one should have to endure that. Soon after, I pressed charges against him. But because of a North Carolina legal case in 1979 that says a victim can’t revoke consent after sex has begun, even if it turns violent, he wasn’t charged with rape. He merely pleaded guilty to two counts of misdemeanor assault on a female, which resulted in roughly 10 months in prison. North Carolina is the only state where ‘no’ doesn’t actually mean ‘no’ -- and this loophole remains. If this happened in Virginia or South Carolina, he would’ve been tried with rape, and he would’ve served a much longer sentence. This is not acceptable. It’s not okay for me or the many others who have been or will be sexually assaulted in the future. It is not justice, plain and simple. That’s why I’m asking you to help me, my attorney, Kris Hilscher, and Sen. Jeff Jackson hold rapists accountable. Please sign this petition in support of a legislative bill in North Carolina that will reverse this horrible law and will lead to a new one that says ‘no’ actually means ‘no’ at every single point. Unfortunately, I won’t benefit from this bill. But other women could, and you can help them get the protection they need by changing this law. North Carolina cannot wait any longer.

Amy Guy
62,907 supporters