Topic

Women's Rights

537 petitions

Update posted 22 hours ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, President of the United States

UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). December 18th, 2009, marks the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the treaty by the United Nations, and while 186 countries have ratified the convention, the United States remains one of only seven countries in the world that have not. Ratification of the treaty is critical and urgent for continuing progress on women's and girls' rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women's rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide. Ratifying CEDAW would strengthen and advance the US Constitution, US leadership, this nation values, the common goods, and humanity goodness and virtues.   http://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-declaration-on-universal-human-rightshttp://www.change.org/petitions/united-nations-human-rights-defenders-declarationhttp://www.change.org/petitions/include-the-universal-declaration-of-human-rights-on-passportshttp://www.change.org/petitions/un-convention-on-the-rights-of-the-older-personshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-international-covenant-on-economic-social-and-cultural-rightshttp://www.change.org/petitions/convention-on-the-protection-of-the-rights-of-all-migrant-workers-and-members-of-their-familieshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilitieshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-declaration-on-the-rights-of-indigenous-peopleshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-convention-on-the-rights-of-the-childhttp://www.change.org/petitions/global-well-being-index-better-life-index-for-the-common-good-and-well-being

Vu Nguyen
343 supporters
Update posted 23 hours ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, President of the United States

Ratify UN Optional Protocol on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)

Despite the adoption of The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) treaty approximately 32 years ago by the United Nations, and while at least 186 countries have ratified the convention, the United States remains one of only few nations in the world that have not. Ratification of the treaty is critical and urgent for continuing progress on women's and girls' rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women's rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide. Ratifying CEDAW and CEDAW Optional Protocol would strengthen and advance the US Constitution, US leadership, this nation values, the greater and common goods, and humanity decency and goodness. The Optional Protocol Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women contains two procedures: A communications procedure allows individual women, or groups of women, to submit claims of violations of rights protected under the Convention to the Committee. The Protocol also creates an inquiry procedure enabling the Committee to initiate inquiries into situations of grave or systematic violations of women’s rights. Ratification of the treaties are critical and urgent for continuing progress on women’s and girls’ rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women’s rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide.   Link to UN treaties: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=IV-8&chapter=4〈=en http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=IV-8-b&chapter=4〈=en http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cedaw/protocol/    

Vu Nguyen
63 supporters
Started 3 days ago

Petition to Justin Alferman, Rob Vescovo, Courtney Curtis, DaRon McGee, Dan Shaul, Gina Mitten, Doug Beck, Missouri State Senate, Missouri State House

Attack the Tampon Tax!

Periods are terrible. Everyone with a uterus knows that. Cramps. Bloating. Acne. Mood swings. Blood.  The list of what makes a menstrual cycle awful goes on and on. However, there is one thing that doesn't need to be on that list: the tampon tax. Feminine hygiene products need to be exempt from sales tax for several different reasons. I've included some important ones below, but be aware that there are many more reasons to destroy the tampon tax! Menstrual products are a necessity for anyone who experiences a menstrual cycle. Women already make only about 77% of what men make. Why should women have to spend more on products they need? Sales tax on essential items, such as tampons, disproportionally affect people of color and those already struggling financially. For example, Hispanic and Latina women only make 54% of what non-Hispanic white men make. Source 1 Feminine hygiene products are considered luxury items by most lawmakers. Because of sanitary reasons, societal pressure, the stigma around menstruation, and many other reasons, freebleeding is simply not an option for many women. Therefore, menstrual products ought to be considered necessities by the law. Sales tax adds up - especially when you consider than the average women would have about 450 periods in her lifetime. That's a lot of pads to buy. Source 2 Charging sales tax for feminine hygiene products punishes women for being women. It penalizes anyone with a uterus just because they bleed once a month. The vast majority of legislators are cis men. They may have wives, they may have daughters, but in the end, most of them are unwilling to create legislation that makes menstrual products exempt from sales tax. Alternatively, these male legislators may be too uncomfortable with this issue to attempt to change things. As a young woman who will be going off to college in two years, I think a lot about finances. I know menstrual products will definitely take a chunk out of my wallet, but it doesn't have to be this way. Making feminine hygiene products exempt from sales tax is a small step for Missouri to make, but it is a big deal for women who are unemployed, struggling to make ends meet because of medical bills or student loans, or just experiencing the difficulties of being a woman. Women should not have to choose between buying food and buying tampons. This petition will be sent to Missouri lawmakers in an attempt to get them to change the tax code. In 2017, HB 841 was an introduced bill about feminine hygiene products, but it was never passed. Signing this petition will help persuade Missouri's legislators to take HB 841 and other bills like it seriously. Many of these members of the Missouri House of Representatives are going to be up for reelection in 2019, so their reactions to this petition can really affect how their constituents will vote next year. As strong, determined citizens, we can get the tampon tax abolished. Join me and help make the world a better place!

Rosie Lopolito
24 supporters
Update posted 4 days ago

Petition to Board of Trustees

Alumni Demand USC Hold Administration Accountable for Supporting Sexual Predators

May 17, 2018 TO: Board of Trustees, University of Southern CaliforniaCC: USC President C.L. Max Nikias       USC Provost Michael Quick       USC Graduate Student Government       USC Undergraduate Student GovernmentFROM: Concerned USC AlumniRE: Abuse of Power and Sexual Assault and Misconduct We, the Alumni at the University of Southern California, condemn the lack of accountability and inaction from the USC administration. We stand unequivocally with the students and staff who have reported the abuse they experienced under gynecologist George Tyndall during his tenure at the Engemann Student Health Center. On May 15, 2018, the Los Angeles Times reported that Tyndall provided services to students for years after numerous reports of inappropriate behavior. The University did not inform his patients or report him, and told the L.A. Times that they were “not legally obligated” to do so. If not for the L.A. Times investigation, Tyndall’s patients and the broader Trojan Community would not have known about Tyndall’s 30 years of sexual misconduct, and his quiet resignation that included a financial payout.  This incident did not occur in isolation. In the past two years, there have been multiple reports of inaction and coverups by USC administration following credible accusations of sexual misconduct from men employed by USC. Namely, two consecutive deans at the Keck School of Medicine [1, 2], a university Vice President of Development, and a professor at the Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work went largely unpunished for inexcusable treatment of women. In each of these cases, USC only admitted wrongdoing once it became evident the story would go public. We do not know how many more cases of abuse have yet to be exposed, but it is clear that the university is unwilling to confront the toxic environment for women they have cultivated over years of neglected accountability. USC has a crisis of moral leadership -- there is a trend of USC administration not holding abusers accountable, instead rewarding them with financial payouts; not treating victims with support, instead ignoring complaints; not respecting the public’s right to know of dangers in the community, instead concealing vital public health information to preserve the institution’s reputation. Students are harmed and victimized by the very hands who ought to ensure their safety. This is a sign of demonstrable negligence from the administration, and as such, we demand the Board of Trustees do the following: Put President C.L. Max Nikias on leave, as it is under his leadership that several published reports of sexual misconduct were handled inadequately. Review existing protocols for responding to sexual harassment and assault on campus to ensure that perpetrators are appropriately held accountable, victims are supported, and the community is made aware of misconduct in an appropriate and timely manner. Offer services and financial support to those who report abuse from Tyndall (85 victims reported abuse as of Provost Quick’s Memo on May 16, 2018). Issue an apology to the community and not simply a letter of admission. As USC Alumni, we do not want USC to be branded as a community that harms its own and condones sexual abuse and misconduct; we ask that USC internally reflects on such abuses of power, as they come in many forms. Tyndall and his abusive colleagues are not the only ones who must be held accountable; they exemplify a cultural problem fostered at the highest levels of the administration that is more concerned with the image of USC than the safety of its students and staff. USC must once and for all change its leadership and its policies to reflect a true desire to put its community first. In Solidarity, Concerned USC Alumni

USC Alumni
502 supporters