Topic

black and african american rights

42 petitions

Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, American Family Insurance Group, United Nations Development Program, Samara Yeshaya, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), President of the United States, Donald Trump, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), FEMA, Hillary Clinton, Council of the European Union, Burger King España, McDonald's, Bank Of America, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Marathon Oil, Klu Klux Klan, FedEx, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment, Animal Planet, Universal Music Spain, Capital One Financial, American Airlines, American Eagle Outfitters, American Electric Power, American Heart Association, American Red Cross

40 ACRES AND A MULE REPARATIONS FOR MOST HIGH CHILDREN

INTRODUCTION Harriet Tubman became famous as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad during the turbulent 1850s. Born a slave on Maryland’s eastern shore, she endured the harsh existence of a field hand, including brutal beatings. In 1849 she fled slavery, leaving her husband and family behind in order to escape. Despite a bounty on her head, she returned to the South at least 19 times to lead her family and hundreds of other slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Tubman also served as a scout, spy and nurse during the Civil War. In 1849 Tubman fled Maryland, leaving behind her free husband of five years, John Tubman, and her parents, sisters, and brothers. “Mah people mus’ go free,” her constant refrain, suggests a determination uncommon among even the most militant slaves. She returned to the South at least nineteen times to lead her family and hundreds of other slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Utilizing her native intelligence and drawing on her boundless courage, she eluded bounty hunters seeking a reward for her capture, which eventually went as high as forty thousand dollars. She never lost a fugitive or allowed one to turn back. Did You Know? Harriet Tubman's birthname was Araminta Ross. Two things sustained her: the pistol at her side and her faith in God. She would not hesitate to use the pistol in self-defense, but it was also a symbol to instruct slaves, making it clear that “dead Negroes tell no tales.” Timid slaves seemed to find courage in her presence; no one ever betrayed her. She affirmed her faith in God in her statement, “I always tole God, I’m gwine to hole stiddy on to you, an’ you’ve got to see me trou [through].” Tubman collaborated with John Brown in 1858 in planning his raid on Harpers Ferry. The two met in Canada where she told him all she knew of the Underground Railroad in the East. Advising him on the area in which he planned to operate, she promised to deliver aid from fugitives in the region. Brown’s admiration for her was immeasurable, and he wanted her to accompany him on the raid. Tubman planned to be present but was ill at the time and could not participate. Tubman’s resistance to slavery did not end with the outbreak of the Civil War. Her services as nurse, scout, and spy were solicited by the Union government. For more than three years she nursed the sick and wounded in Florida and the Carolinas, tending whites and blacks, soldiers and contrabands. Tubman was a short woman without distinctive features. With a bandanna on her head and several front teeth missing, she moved unnoticed through rebel territory. This made her invaluable as a scout and spy under the command of Col. James Montgomery of the Second Carolina Volunteers. As leader of a corps of local blacks, she made several forays into rebel territory, collecting information. Armed with knowledge of the location of cotton warehouses, ammunition depots, and slaves waiting to be liberated, Colonel Montgomery made several raids in southern coastal areas. Tubman led the way on his celebrated expedition up the Combahee River in June 1863. For all of her work, Tubman was paid only two hundred dollars over a three-year period and had to support herself by selling pies, gingerbread, and root beer. After the war, Tubman returned to Auburn, New York, and continued to help blacks forge new lives in freedom. She cared for her parents and other needy relatives, turning her residence into the Home for Indigent and Aged Negroes. Lack of money continued to be a pressing problem, and she financed the home by selling copies of her biography and giving speeches. Her most memorable appearance was at the organizing meeting of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896 in Washington, D.C. Two generations came together to celebrate the strength of black women and to continue their struggle for a life of dignity and respect. Harriet Tubman, the oldest member present, was the embodiment of their strength and their struggle. Sarah Bradford, Harriet: The Moses of Her People (1886); Earl Conrad, Harriet Tubman (1943); Dorothy Sterling, ed., We Are Your Sisters: Black Women in the Nineteenth Century (1984). This is more than history this is a Biblical moment that our ancestors pave the way for us to have I am being led by the Holy Spirit to start this movement of getting us reparations so that we can heal ourselves from the wounds of our ancestors pain and affliction. I can only imagine to change that this could bring to the people of the Lost tribes I pray that everyone takes heed and understands that this is the time the first will be the last and the last will be the first praise the most high for His blessings Samara Yeshaya

Samara Yeshaya
432 supporters
Update posted 6 days ago

Petition to Judge David Gooding/Jewish Family Services Jacksonville

Let Nevaeh stay with her African American family

Two year old Nevaeh Alexander has been in foster care and around her family since she was born. She has a grandfather, great grandmother, uncle, aunt, cousins and etc that she knows and loves. A family in the North is trying to take her away from her family. Her cousin, Latrisha McFarland,  applied to adopt her after she found out that the other family had put in for the adoption. According to research, kids are hardwired to take cues about the world, and draw a sense of physical and emotional security, from their parents/ and when they’re taken from their caregivers prematurely, their development may stall and potentially suffer irrevocable harm. “These early separations have a profound effect on the overall capacity for people to function and be useful members of society,” van der Kolk says. “Your brain is a predictive system. If people get ripped away from you, you get a brain that will say, ‘People will mess with me. People will hurt me. People will take advantage of me.’ That becomes your basic orientation as you grow up.” Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, director of the Trauma Center in Boston and a childhood trauma expert According to care.com- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), social developments at age 2 include toddler separation anxiety and begin to show signs of separation anxiety -- even if they didn't as babies.  There is the possibility the individual will permanently take on the “victim” or “victimizer” role. Long term control issues may be prominent. A serious effect may be the disruption in ego development, with an increased incidence of “borderlinepersonality” problems. Lack of self-awareness may be ongoing. There may be long term subtle language problems. As adults, these individuals may be rigid, inflexible, and not able to deal appropriately with aggressive impulses.  The courts have decided that she would be better off with this family (who live far away) because it would be "nice" for her to grow up with her older sibling they adopted some years ago. They are willing to devastate  this two year old little girl and her relatives by taking her away from blood family in order for her to call other people uncle, grandfather etc.  Why risk all of that to satify this family's need? The needs of the many outweight the needs of the one. Latrisha will file an appeal. Please sign the petition and tell the Jewish Family Services and the Judge that this African American girl should remain with her family. Thank you so kindly - God Bless .  

BAA ANDREWS
920 supporters
Update posted 3 weeks ago

Petition to Tara Gard

Increase the black teacher poulation in Ousd

Dear Ms.Gard, Mass incarceration is a big problem in the United States today, more specifically for African Americans. This issue dates back until the dismantlement of slavery, but the new wave of incarceration is a form of modern slavery. The first step to getting African American out of prisons is to get them off the street, before that we need to get them good jobs, and for any of that to work we need them to thrive in the classroom. It can be difficult for African Americans youth to stay the course and get a degree when their teachers do not support them, have strong biases, and do not understand them. Those things can be differed by African American teachers and mentors in schools. The problem that we are addressing is the fact that the students are predominantly black and brown, and almost all of their teachers are white.  For the past couple years OUSD has posted the racial breakdown of the district. On the 2017-2018 edition, it said that the student body is only 11.4 percent white while the teacher body was ~50 percent. The fact that there is such a large gap between the demographics of our student and teacher bodies in our school district demonstrates how this issue of diversity in the classroom is real for us and those in the surrounding communities. Consequently, this gap causes decreased graduation levels, implicit and explicit bias, and the lack of teacher mentorship and support. In an article by Bill de Blasio, It said that diverse classrooms can play a key role in dispelling damaging stereotypes and teach the students to appreciate their differences. By associating a diverse teacher workforce and the dispelling of damaging stereotypes, Bill de Blasio argues that the addition of teachers of color will bring students closer together to have a stronger community. Since the community will be stronger within the new generation of students, the school system will export more understanding people who learn to accept differences and make equity a reality in the United States. The problem of teacher diversity is something that most turn a blind eye to, but in reality it is something that can bring african Americans out of this dark, violent, and subordinate view to unify our country and create equity for all. We demand for an increase in the black teacher population. We are specifically calling out for Black teachers(not only for the black community but in all oakland schools). Our ask is that We want Tara Gard(deputy chief of talent division in the ousd schools) to take out 1 day out of each year to attend a Bay Area black expo and demand for them to apply at Oakland tech and to recruit more black teachers. We feel that her viewing this will change her views on the issues in our schools. We went to a dinner produced by The Black Teacher Project, celebrating black teachers. We interviewed them and they think Tara should do this. Our action plan is to try to increase the minority teachers population by implementing and developing a new recruitment plan. We are trying to petition for teachers to come from HBCU job fairs and apply for our Oakland schools. In a recent article by “the black teacher effect”, there was a study showing that a black student who had at least one black teacher in elementary school were 29% less likely to dropout of high school (which since then, is now much more). In a recent survey we made, the mass majority of the 9th grade students at Oakland Tech came to a correspondence that they have all non-minority teachers. This lead us to follow up question we asked, “can you relate or feel comfortable talking to your teachers.” Almost 90% of the students inputted that they can agree with their teachers only 30% of the time. However, an increasing amount of minority students felt there was almost an ethnic gap for discipline due to the fact that they felt that they would get in more trouble than the white students. Like in the “Black panther Party Ten point plan”, we “We want decent Education for our people that exposes the truth nature of this decadent American society. We want education that teaches us our true history and our role in the present-day society”. To begin with, we will give our petition signatures to Ms.Morrison(co-principal), Mr.Diaz(co-principals), and Tara Gard We are trying to bring awareness towards not only our signatories/petition signers, but also to our school leaders to prioritize diversity so they are intentional about recruiting minority teachers (not just choosing 1 token minority teacher). As an incoming 10th grader, from my own personal experiences and cultural backgrounds, I believe that I can understand and more trust educators that are perceived with cultural and experiential similarities.  

Julia Allen
149 supporters