Allow hunting trophies to be imported from anywhere in Africa

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Trophy hunting in Africa has been one of the most effective forms of wildlife tourism, giving value to animals that would otherwise be either pests or threats to the locals. We may gawk over lions and elephants but they are not easy animals with which to coexist. When living with these sort of animals, you deal with crop raids, property damage, loss of livestock, and in some cases, loss of human life. If animals like these that are nuisances to humans have no value and have no benefit to local people, they will all be shot, trapped and poisoned as problem animals or the locals will turn to poaching to pay for the damages and to feed their families (rhinoceros horn has more street value than gold or cocaine). Establishment of game reserves where hunting is allowed gives value to the wildlife, thereby providing compensation from hunting licenses, jobs (as trackers, skinners, chefs, etc.), and whatever meat is taken during the hunt is distributed evenly among the villages. Also, the more the value that animals have, the more likely that ranchers will want them on their land so that they may reap the rewards. Hunters are also willing to hunt in areas lacking high densities of wildlife or attractive scenery, and where people and livestock occur, stressing the potential for trophy hunting to generate revenues where ecotourism may not be viable. This means that hunting reserves can be implemented in places where regular photo safaris wouldn't thrive

This is an extremely important issue to me for many reasons. The first and probably the most critical is that wild animals and wild places are in dire straits today. As we speak, more and more wild land is being consumed for human use and wild animals are being poached into oblivion. Thus, I feel that it’s important to find ways to conserve this disappearing wilderness anyway we can. Commercial big game hunting, when done right, has shown itself to be one of the best forces in conserving disappearing wild-land across Sub-Saharan Africa in giving the animals there value and giving locals an opportunity to make money so that less people turn to poaching.

Feel free to explore these sources

https://www.iucn.org/downloads/iucn_informingdecisionsontrophyhuntingv1.pdf

http://tedxcopenhagen.dk/talk/how-the-ban-on-lion-hunt-killed-the-lions/

http://www.radiolab.org/story/rhino-hunter/

http://www.wideopenspaces.com/trophy-hunting-may-key-saving-endangered-big-game-pics/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUA8i5S0YMU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwUyqXwobMo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMfv7CuVH_E&t=25s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nT_aXO_yB0M

Lindsey, Peter A., P. A. Roulet, and S. S. Romanach. "Economic and conservation significance of the trophy hunting industry in sub-Saharan Africa." Biological conservation 134, no. 4 (2007): 455-469.

Whitman, Karyl, Anthony M. Starfield, Henley S. Quadling, and Craig Packer. "Sustainable trophy hunting of African lions." Nature 428, no. 6979 (2004): 175-178.

Lindsey, Peter Andrew, Guy Andrew Balme, Vernon Richard Booth, and Neil Midlane. "The significance of African lions for the financial viability of trophy hunting and the maintenance of wild land." PloS one 7, no. 1 (2012): e29332.

Lindsey, Peter A., R. Alexander, L. G. Frank, A. Mathieson, and S. S. Romanach. "Potential of trophy hunting to create incentives for wildlife conservation in Africa where alternative wildlife‐based land uses may not be viable." Animal conservation 9, no. 3 (2006): 283-291.

 



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