#LovelaceOrBust - Get Ada in the Long Room

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#LovelaceOrBust - Get Ada in the Long Room

This petition made change with 302 supporters!
DUCSS started this petition to Trinity College Dublin and

Attention all Trinity College Dublin students,


as you may be aware, the Provost of Trinity College sent out an email several weeks ago asking for suggestions as to which sculpture busts the Long Room in the Old Library should have commissioned. As you might know there are currently 40 marble busts of scholars there already, all of which are men. As a result, Trinity is currently looking for suggestions as to which women should be added to the Long Room next. We, the committee of DUCSS, have but a modest proposal: Ada Lovelace.


Ada Lovelace isn’t the most well-known woman in history but when one is talking about Computer Science there really is no woman who is more important.


Ada was born in the year 1815 as the only legitimate child of famed poet Lord Byron. In fear she might end up like her father, Ada’s mother heavily encouraged her to pursue a different art. The art of mathematics. In her early life, Ada Lovelace pursued mathematics and the sciences. She studied advanced mathematics at the University of London. At the age of 17, she met Charles Babbage. She translated and heavily expanded on an article written regarding the Analytical Machine Babbage had theorised and in 1843 her notes were published in a scientific journal. Ada Lovelace was essentially writing ground-breaking computer code in a world where computers were little more than a theoretical dream.


While her notes received little recognition at the time, Ada Lovelace is argued to be the first ever computer programmer, being the first to describe how code could be created to allow for a machine to handle instructions. Together she and Babbage worked on the Analytical Machine, a computer that was theoretically Turing complete before the words ‘Turing complete’ were ever coined. Unfortunately Lovelace passed away at the age of 37 from uterine cancer. Her contributions to the fields of mathematics and computer science are incredibly understated yet highly vital. Her work being so far ahead of the time, would not be appreciated until the 1950’s when the world of computers became more feasible.


The fields of STEM, just like the Long Room sculptures, are sorely lacking in female representation. We firmly believe that we should encourage women with a passion to join these fields by fully recognising the hard work of the scholarly women whose contributions the very foundations of STEM are built on.


All that we ask of you is to join us on this journey to getting Ada Lovelace the recognition she deserves. Share the word among your friends, respond to the Provost’s email, sign our petition or even just spread awareness on social media. We have nothing to lose but our chains.


Yours Truly,


The DUCSS Committee


#LovelaceOrBust

 

 


 

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