Petition Closed
Petitioning The United State Senate and 7 others

Ensure that the Census Bureau's American Community Survey is not eliminated

As the Washington Post Editorial Board writes, "As James Madison argued around the time of the first census, collecting information on the socio-economic status of the population is one of those basic things that government is uniquely suited to do, and it benefits everyone. Businesses deciding whether to sell tractors or tricycles want to know how many people live in a given area, whether they mostly live in apartments or houses, with how many children, and how far they travel to work. Consumers then get access to goods and services they desire. Municipal planners determining whether to build a new senior center need to know where the elderly live in their town, and if they have family around to care for them. Government agencies targeting $400 billion in annual anti-poverty, health-care or highway spending require granular data on things such as local incomes. Lawmakers debating health-care policy should have up-to-date information on how many people are uninsured, and where they are concentrated."

Letter to
The United State Senate
Representative Patrick McHenry
Representative Joseph Crowley
and 5 others
Senator Charles Schumer
Senator Kirsten Gillibrand
U.S. House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
President of the United States
I just signed the following petition addressed to: The United State Senate.


I am the founder and executive editor of MyTwoCensus.com, originally created as the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 Census. The US Senate must vote to ensure that the Census Bureau's American Community Survey is not eliminated, despite the House of Representatives, led by the GOP, recently voting to eliminate it.

The Washington Post Editorial Board writes, "As James Madison argued around the time of the first census, collecting information on the socio-economic status of the population is one of those basic things that government is uniquely suited to do, and it benefits everyone. Businesses deciding whether to sell tractors or tricycles want to know how many people live in a given area, whether they mostly live in apartments or houses, with how many children, and how far they travel to work. Consumers then get access to goods and services they desire. Municipal planners determining whether to build a new senior center need to know where the elderly live in their town, and if they have family around to care for them. Government agencies targeting $400 billion in annual anti-poverty, health-care or highway spending require granular data on things such as local incomes. Lawmakers debating health-care policy should have up-to-date information on how many people are uninsured, and where they are concentrated."


Sincerely,