Petition Closed
Petitioning EPA's Region 2 Administrator Judith Enck and 7 others

Tell Ford Motors to remove ALL the toxic sludge they dumped in Ringwood!

The United States Environmental Protection Agency will soon decide how Ford Motor Company should clean up the 500-acre Ringwood Superfund Site, where Ford Motor Company dumped tens of thousands of tons of paint sludge into old abandoned mine shafts, leaching landfills, the lawns of the Ramapough Mountain Indians, and the very trails of Ringwood State Park five decades ago.

All options are on the table – from doing absolutely nothing to controversially capping the sludge in place and leaving it there forever to completely removing all of the toxic waste.  The people in Upper Ringwood are still suffering from devastating health impacts, staggering rates of premature deaths, rare cancers, and autoimmune diseases believed to be linked to the witches’ brew of toxins left in their homes, yards and community. 

Astronomically high levels of lead and dioxin have been found in attics and yards, while the neighboring mines – including those in Ringwood State Park – sit just upstream from the drinking water source for one to two million people.

Please tell USEPA that this community should no longer suffer from the toxic legacy Ford Motors dumped in their backyards.  Don’t let Ford Motor Company get away with capping the site and leaving tens of thousands of tons of paint sludge behind!  Tell USEPA that they must require Ford to dig up everything they dumped!  

Take action now – the families of Ringwood, and anyone who believes a State Park should be safe to enjoy, are counting on you!

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Letter to
EPA's Region 2 Administrator Judith Enck
EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson
Representative Frank Pallone
and 5 others
Representative Rush Holt
Representative Scott Garrett
Senator Cory Booker
Senator Robert Menendez
President of the United States
At the Ringwood Mines/Landfill Superfund Site in Upper Ringwood, New Jersey, the Ramapough Mountain Indian Tribe has suffered staggering rates of premature deaths, rare cancers, and autoimmune diseases believed the be linked to the toxic waste dumped by Ford Motor Company in the 1960s and 1970s. These hard-working families suffered in agony for decades, but the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has the chance to finally make things right.

I understand that you have laid out seven options for the final cleanup plan, including no action and capping of the toxic waste. I respectfully urge you to choose what is currently listed as Option Seven – the full removal of all toxic sludge and contamination. By doing so, you will rightfully require Ford Motor Company to complete a full remediation of the site, removing all of the paint sludge, restoring Ringwood State Park as safe public land, and removing the leachate and garbage from the landfill areas.

This tragic saga was investigated in HBO’s new documentary, “Mann v. Ford,” which revealed that the community’s devastating health impacts continue, with the cancer-causing dioxin at high levels in residents’ attics and neighboring mines filled with huge quantities of toxic waste, just upstream from the drinking water source for one to two million people.

As USEPA Region 2 Superfund Chief Walter Mugdan explained at the recent community meeting, which was so filled with people that over 50 attendees waited outside the meeting just to have their say, the USEPA prematurely delisted this site from the federal Superfund National Priority List in the past, leaving the community exposed to thousands of tons of paint sludge. I urge you to not make that mistake a second time in this State-designated environmental justice community.

Please protect the human health and environment for the Upper Ringwood community and the one to two million people that depend on this area for as a drinking water source. Restore this community back to a safe place where parents can raise their children without fear of toxic chemicals impacting their health, and where families can walk trails at a State park without worrying about what toxic contaminants are underfoot or underground.

Thank you in advance for your consideration regarding this urgent human health issue.