Petition Closed

Of course we would like to stop all animals from being slaughtered. We want this holocaust to end; however, in the meantime, the pigs, cows and chickens need our help.

Please sign our petition and help stop the transport of pigs, cows and chickens to all slaughterhouses during heatwaves and subzero temperatures in Canada and the USA. 

*There is effectively no federal regulation of farmed animal transportation in the United States

Letter to
Toronto, Ontario Minister of Agriculture and Food The Honourable Kathleen Wynne
Animal Products USDA
Live Animals USDA
and 8 others
Animal Welfare USDA
Animal Welfare USDA
Animal Welfare USDA
Minister of Health The Honourable Rona Ambrose
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food The Honourable Gerry Ritz
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food The Honourable Gerry Ritz
Secretary of Agriculture USA Tom Vilsack
Premier of Ontario Kathleen Wynne
It was -17°C this morning and felt like -28°C with windchill, but in a transport truck traveling on the highway at 100 km/hr the windchill factor is much greater, and for the pigs near porthole, it could feel like -40°C or worse. At Toronto Pig Save's vigil this morning on January 2, 2014, we saw 12 transport trucks between 7:40 and 10:10 am. "Quality Meat Packers" continued the slaughter and transport in this extreme weather, anything to continue to profit as the pigs suffered unbearable cold weather.

We witnessed one pig with purple ears! Pig suffer from frostbite and hypothermia in extreme cold weather. It's horrific! Most of the panels on the transport trucks were closed but depending on how far the death trucks travel, how crowded they are, and where the pigs are (e.g. it's bad for the pigs nearest portholes), the suffering is unimaginable. Crowding predisposes pigs to frostbite because it prevents the pigs from repositioning themselves in response to cold spots in the trailer & also exposes them to vehicle’s metal walls.

Please stop live transport during subzero temperatures and heatwaves. It is the moral thing to do, by law in both the USA and Canada.

Why is this not being enforced?

*There is effectively no federal regulation of farmed animal transportation in the United States

The U.S. has on the books a law, known as the 28-Hour Law, requiring that livestock transported across state lines be humanely unloaded into pens for food, water, and at least 5 hours of rest every 28 hours. However this law is rarely, if ever, enforced. Even if the 28-Hour Law were enforced, it would still not be adequate to assure the well-being of transported animals.
Time spent in transit is stressful both physically and mentally for farmed animals. Problems that commonly occur during transport include overcrowding, lack of bedding, lack of opportunities for rest, and exposure to extreme heat or cold.
Poor and abusive handling of animals during loading and unloading and at auctions also increases animal stress, injury, and suffering during the transport process.
According to data from the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, approximately 0.26 percent of transported pigs die each year as a result of transport — this translates to 260,000 pigs annually.
It has been estimated that 0.08 percent of pigs (or approximately 82,000 pigs) per year transported to market in the U.S. arrive as “fatigued” — out of breath and unable to get off the truck on their own.
The number of pigs being transported over state lines increased from 30 million in 1970 to 50 million in 2001.
In the U.S., it has been estimated that 1 percent of feed lot cattle (or approximately 120,000 cattle) die as a consequence of transport stress.
According to a study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the average mortality rate is 12.6 deaths for every 1,000 cattle entering feedlots.
The U.S. exports thousands of pigs, sheep, and horses each year to Mexico for slaughter.


According to Federal and Canadian Government Law Transport Regulations, the Health of Animals Act, Part XII, Sections 143, (1)(d) and (e) state that “No person shall transport or cause to be transported any animal in a railway car, motor vehicle, aircraft, vessel, crate or container if injury or undue suffering is likely to be caused to the animal by reason of undue exposure to the weather or inadequate ventilation.” In Canada, farm animals are routinely transported during mid-day intense heat or subzero temperatures in overcrowded trailers with no tarps, with no forced ventilation or water, as documented by CETFA Inspectors.

Please watch and listen to all 3 of these videos and bare witness to the pig's screams as they needlessly suffer. You can see first hand what is happening to the pigs during transport to the slaughterhouses in the following videos. Pig vomiting in back of truck Pigs in back of truck suffering needlessly Pigs horrific screams

Please Advise.