Confirmed victory

Killing Deer Does NOT Manage Populations; Proof It Only Fulfills Division of Wild"Death" Coffers: "All of this helps explain why, even after decades of hunting, deer numbers remain high in much of the country. In fact, the basis for hunting regulations such as hunting seasons and bag limits (how many deer a hunter is permitted to kill), are premised on this compensatory theory. The goal is to allow the sport of killing to take place while at the same time, conserve enough deer for hunters to enjoy the following season. But how many deer exactly should each state allow to be killed and still have enough for next year? In other words, what is the "maximum sustained yield"? This is one of the persistently difficult and challenging questions facing state wildlife managers; and since these managers are compelled to satisfy their hunting constituency, the more deer in the field the better. If there aren't enough deer, the wildlife managers may end up without jobs(see prior blog post 9/25/09 "The Structure of our State Wildlife Agency System..)"

AND

"Hundreds of communities across the country are grappling with issues related to deer populations. After 10 years of culling, Princeton, New Jersey has recently decided to take a break. However new culling programs are being proposed almost daily. Controversial culls have been introduced throughout Westchester county and parts of upstate New York, as well as many towns in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan. Residents are told, often by representatives of their state wildlife agency, that killing is necessary because deer are very adaptable and their numbers can increase out of control. But given the number of species struggling today under the stress of environmental conditions such as global warming, under what biological theory could deer be overpopulating themselves? Being highly adaptable seems a bit unscientific and perhaps not the full explanation.

AND

"Basic biology dictates that animal populations, including deer, do not just grow exponentially out of control." --Katherine McGill, from http://www.examiner.com/article/realities-of-hunting-as-a-population-control-why-there-are-so-many-deer-today

Letter to
Director Ohio Division of Natural Resources James Zehringer
Seven Hills Ohio Mayor Richard Dell'AQuila
Seven Hills Ohio Council President Michael C. Barth
and 4 others
Councilman - Ward 4, President of Council Pro Tem Pete Draganic
Council-at-Large Tom Snitzky
Seven Hills OH Councilman Jim Tripi
Ward 3 Seven Hills OH Councilwoman Caryl Lecznar
Drop Bow Hunting AND Nuisance Permit Discussion. Do not allow any lethal methods in Seven Hills