Petitioning Premier Kathleen Wynne and 2 others

Ontario Citizens Demand an Environmental Assessment of Enbridge’s proposed Line 9 Reversal

518
Supporters

This major project poses considerable new risks not present in the previous life of Line 9, requiring a more comprehensive review than the Federal N.E.B. review process can provide.

This project is more than a reversal of direction. It involves an increase in capacity, and a significant change in what will be shipped through the pipeline. For the first time, more dangerous tar sands oil (DilBit) could be sent through Line 9.

Line 9 runs through 115 communities, including Toronto, Sarnia, Hamilton, London, and Kingston. It crosses many indigenous territories, and dozens of major rivers draining into Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

Tar sands ‘DilBit’, raw bitumen diluted with condensate, is more corrosive to pipelines than conventional oil. And in the event of a spill, it’s more hazardous to human health and harder to clean up. Two of the largest pipeline spills in US history have been recently-converted DilBit pipelines.

Only a full environmental assessment can illuminate the project’s risks to the public and the environment. A spill into any of the major rivers Line 9 crosses could contaminate the drinking water of millions of Ontarians and cause permanent damage to ecosystems.

Enbridge’s poor track record on pipeline safety warrants an independent review of their safety and emergency response plans, as well as the physical integrity of the pipeline.

Ontario residents need to know the risks of allowing this project to proceed; including the threat to property values, personal health, and safety. A full environmental assessment is the only way to prevent a disaster before it’s too late.

Launched July 1, 2013

Letter to
Premier Kathleen Wynne
Minister of the Environment Hon. James Bradley
Premier of Ontario Kathleen Wynne
I am a resident of Ontario, and I believe that this major project poses considerable new risks not present in the previous life of Line 9, requiring a more comprehensive review than the Federal N.E.B. review process can provide.

This project is more than a reversal of direction. It involves an increase in capacity, and a significant change in what will be shipped through the pipeline. For the first time, more dangerous tar sands oil (DilBit) could be sent through Line 9.

Line 9 runs through 115 communities, including Toronto, Sarnia, Hamilton, London, and Kingston. It crosses many indigenous territories, and dozens of major rivers draining into Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

Tar sands ‘DilBit’, raw bitumen diluted with condensate, is more corrosive to pipelines than conventional oil. And in the event of a spill, it’s more hazardous to human health and harder to clean up. Two of the largest pipeline spills in US history have been recently-converted DilBit pipelines.

Only a full environmental assessment can illuminate the project’s risks to the public and the environment. A spill into any of the major rivers Line 9 crosses could contaminate the drinking water of millions of Ontarians and cause permanent damage to ecosystems.

Enbridge’s poor track record on pipeline safety warrants an independent review of their safety and emergency response plans, as well as the physical integrity of the pipeline.

Ontario residents need to know the risks of allowing this project to proceed; including the threat to property values, personal health, and safety. A full environmental assessment is the only way to prevent a disaster before it’s too late.