Petition for the NCC to restore access to the Gatineau Park Parkways

Petition for the NCC to restore access to the Gatineau Park Parkways

0 have signed. Let’s get to 7,500!
At 7,500 signatures, this petition is more likely to get a reaction from the decision maker!
Ala' Qadi started this petition to National Capital Commission Ottawa (National Capital Commission Ottawa) and

Le français suit

This is a petition for the NCC to restore access to the Champlain Parkway, Gatineau Parkway and Fortune Parkway in Gatineau Park to pre-pandemic levels (prior to 2020).

In the spring and summer of 2021, Starting May 1st 2021 , the NCC closed the Champlain Parkway, Gatineau Parkway and Lake Fortune Parkway to  motor vehicle access except from 1pm to half an hour after sunset on Wednesdays/Saturdays and Sundays. This meant vehicle access was limited to less than 15% of the time. Meanwhile, cyclists had access 100% of the time.

This spring and summer, the NCC has a similar discriminatory schedule to last year with the parkway closed almost 85% of the time starting May 7th 2022. The only difference is that there is a weekend shuttle on Saturdays and Sundays to be launched sometime this summer, which does not solve many of the problems.

The shuttle only runs on weekends from June 25th to August 25th and only from 9:10am to 4:45pm.

This has led to inequitable, and non-inclusive access that does not respect the needs of the diverse majority of the park users and Canadian society. 

It  is worth mentioning that the electrical scooters that the NCC provided from P2 take  8 and half hours nonstop to get from P2 to Champlain lookout and back, which is unrealistic demand  for a person with disability. For those people with disabilities, seniors, or families with young children who may have the physical and cognitive ability to ride an e-bike, it is cost prohibitive to rent one

It  is worth mentioning that the electrical scooters that the NCC provided from P2 take  8 and half hours nonstop to get from P2 to Champlain lookout and back, which is unrealistic demand  for a person with disability. For those people with disabilities, seniors, or families with young children who may have the physical and cognitive ability to ride an e-bike, it is cost prohibitive to rent one

Gatineau Parkways schedule—May 1st, 2021 and current schedule starting May 7th, 2022

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

Closed to motor vehicles, only active use all day
 

Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday

Only active use until 1 pm
Motor vehicle access only From 1 pm to 30 minutes after sunset*, shared with active use.
 

See the details at:

https://ncc-ccn.gc.ca/places/gatineau-park-parkways-schedule

When the Parkways are closed, 13 parking lots with 377 free spaces in arguably the most popular destinations in the Park, are inaccessible:

  1.  Pink Lake Lookout (9 spaces)
  2. Pink Lake Trail (40 spaces)
  3. Waterfall Trail (18 spaces)
  4. Lauriault Trail and Picnic Area (37 spaces)
  5. Mulvihill Lake and Picnic Area (30 spaces)
  6. King Mountain Trail and Picnic Area (42 spaces)
  7. Bourgeois Lake (15 spaces)
  8. Huron Lookout (32 spaces)
  9. Étienne Brûlé Lookout and Picnic Area(35 spaces)
  10. Keogan Shelter (34 spaces)
  11. Fortune Lake Lookout (9 spaces)
  12. Penguin Picnic Area (12 spaces)
  13. Champlain Lookout (64 spaces)

Source: https://ncc-ccn.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=edabcb7ef5a4418e8fc19f0c8c9bb062

 

Furthermore, there is no direct access to the picnic areas at Mulvihill Lake, Lauriault, Étienne Brûlé, King Mountain, and Penguin. The only exception to the closure is after 1:00pm to half an hour after sunset on Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday afternoons.

There are no more short hikes to Pink Lake, King Mountain, Waterfall Trail, Champlain Lookout Loop, or to Western Cabin. This also limits access to any of those places on a morning on ALL WEEKDAYS.

The current schedule:

1.   Gives favouritism to healthy “active users” who are as defined by the NCC are using the pavement of the Parkways and not the trails in the Park itself.

2.   Discriminates against people with disabilities.

2.1.  22% of the Canadian population, or 8.3M people, identify with a disability. The most common being mobility, pain, and flexibility.

2.2.  “Ableism” is defined as a belief system, analogous to racism, sexism or ageism, that sees persons with disabilities as being less worthy of respect and consideration, less able to contribute and participate, or of less inherent value than others. It can limit the opportunities of persons with disabilities and reduce their inclusion in the life of their communities.

2.3.  Ableist attitudes are often based on the view that disability is an “anomaly to normalcy,” rather than an inherent and expected variation in the human condition. Ableism may also be expressed in ongoing paternalistic and patronizing behaviour toward people with disabilities.

3.   Discriminates against senior citizens.

3.1.  18% of the Canadian population, or 6.8M people, are 65 years of age or older.

3.2.  “Ageism" refers to two concepts: a socially constructed way of thinking about older persons based on negative attitudes and stereotypes about aging and a tendency to structure society based on an assumption that everyone is young, thereby failing to respond appropriately to the real needs of older persons.

3.3.  Ageism is often a cause for individual acts of age discrimination and also discrimination that is more systemic in nature, such as in the design and implementation of services, programs and facilities.

4.   Discriminates against families with young children. Children are most active in the mornings and nap in the afternoon. There is no morning access all week. Cycling with kids in tow is not an option on the steep Parkways. Picnics at Mulvahill, Etienne Brule King Mountain are out of the question.

5.   Treats other recreational users such as painters, photographers, and birdwatchers as second-class citizens.

Discriminates against average hikers and walkers who find the trails that are accessible from municipal roads too cumbersome to navigate, too steep to climb, and too far away for popular destinations.

Last summer this schedule led to over crowdedness on hiking trails and overflowing parking lots on the afternoons the Parkways were accessible by motor vehicle. Watch the extreme crowdedness due to the closures last summer:

https://youtu.be/8nEOLHsS8uQ

We are not against safety for cyclists, in fact we support that, however we are against closing access to the Park. The NCC can reduce speed limits on the Gatineau Parkways and ensure that police enforce speed limits. The NCC can invest in creating cycle lanes adjacent to the Gatineau Park Parkways.

Gatineau Park is the largest natural area in Canada’s Capital Region. It is the national capital’s conservation park. The Gatineau Parkways were built over 60 years ago to bring ALL Canadians into the park. It is not a training track for athletes. It must be inclusive and accessible for all Canadians, just as it was before the pandemic began in 2020.

We petition the NCC to restore access to Gatineau Parkways to pre-pandemic levels.

 

Further Information:

This is how the new schedule has changed access to the Park. Accessing the locations listed below will require driving to parking lots accessible off municipal roads on the edges of Gatineau Park.  The only parking lot open from the south entrance is P3 which is at the south entrance due to the closure

  •   A hike to Pink Lake starting point from P2 will take an extra 6.6km round trip, or P6 requires an extra 7.6km round trip. A hike from P3, walking on the Gatineau Parkway will require 14.6km round trip.
  •  A hike to Champlain Lookout, requires a hike from the paid P12 and will require an extra 8.2 to 10.2km of hiking, some through difficult trails or and. Or parking at  the paid P6 and hiking for  17.4 km round trip. The only option for access form the south entrance  is by using P3 walking on the Champlain Parkway for 36.6 km round trip
  •  A hike to Western Cabin will now require an extra will 8.2 to 10.2km of hiking, some through difficult trails from the paid P12 parking lot.
  •  A hike to King Mountain now requires an extra 4.2km round trip from P7 trails. There is no direct access trails from P6, a hike from P6 requires an extra 7 km round trip including walking on the pavement of the Champlin Parkway. The only option from the South Entrance is P3 and walking on the Champlain parkway for 26km round trip.
  •  A hike to Étienne Brûlé Lookout and Picnic Area now requires an extra 9.2km from the paid P12 or 10.6 extra km from P10. The only option from the South Entrance is  from P3  walking on the Champlain parkway for 36km round trip.

In addition, if any hiker or walker wants to access any of these spots from the nearest handicap parking spot and walking/rolling on the pavement of the Gatineau Parkways, the distances are as follows:

  • The closest parking lot to Pink Lake Lookout is P3 (South Entrance), which is a 6.1 km hike up an 113m elevation, and an estimated travel time for an able-bodied person of 1 hour, 19 minutes—one way.
  •  The closest parking lot to Champlain Lookout is P10 (Fortune), which is a 6.2 km hike up an 142m elevation, and an estimated travel time for an able-bodied person of 1 hour, 21 minutes—one way.
  • The closest parking lot to King Mountain/Black Lake Picnic Area is P6 (Mackenzie King Estate), which is a 3.7 km hike up an 101m elevation, and an estimated travel time for an able-bodied person of 50 minutes—one way, plus you need to carry your picnic supplies.

For those people with disabilities, seniors, or families with young children who may have the physical and cognitive ability to ride an e-bike, it will cost $40 per hour to rent one. A young family carrying a toddler or someone wanting to carry a picnic will need to pay an additional $12 per hour to rent a bike trailer. This is cost prohibitive for many people with disabilities , seniors, and young families. For example, one vehicle could carry a family of four to the Champlain Lookout. When the Parkways are closed to vehicles during the week, this same family would need to rent four e-bikes for a minimum of two hours each to make the same visit to the Champlain Lookout, costing an exorbitant $360. Meanwhile the able-bodied who can cycle or hike by their own power to the Champlain Lookout pays $0.

Note: None of the trails accessing these points are universally accessible so the distances referenced above are measured using the shortest possible route using the Gatineau/Fortune/Champlain Parkway roadway system.

.**********************************************************************************************

Pétition pour que la CCN restaure l’accès aux promenades du parc de la Gatineau

English precedes

Ceci est une pétition pour que la CCN restaure l’accès aux promenades Champlain, de la Gatineau et du Lac-Fortune dans le parc de la Gatineau tel qu’il se trouvait avant la pandémie (avant 2020)

Au printemps et à l’été 2021, à partir du 1er mai, la CCN a fermé l’accès des promenades Champlain, de la Gatineau et du Lac-Fortune aux véhicules motorisés, sauf de 13h à 30 minutes après le coucher du soleil les mercredis, samedis et dimanches. Ceci signifie que l’accès aux véhicules motorisés est limité à moins de 15% du temps. Par contre, les cyclistes ont accès 100% du temps.

Cette année, pour le printemps et l’été, la CCN a décrété un horaire tout aussi discriminatoire que celui de l’an dernier puisque, à compter du 7 mai 2022, les promenades sont encore fermées pendant 85% du temps. La seule différence est qu’une navette est présente durant les weekends, ce qui ne règle en rien les problèmes.

Horaire des promenades du parc de la Gatineau - à partir du 1re mai en 2021 et du 7 mai en 2022

Lundi, mardi, jeudi et vendredi

Fermées aux véhicules motorisés, entièrement réservées à la mobilité active.

Mercredi, samedi et dimanche

Réservées à la mobilité active jusqu’à 13h.

Accès aux véhicules motorisés autorisé seulement à compter de 13h jusqu’à 30 minutes après le coucher du soleil, en partage avec la mobilité active.

Voir les détails à :

https://ccn-ncc.gc.ca/endroits/horaire-des-promenades-du-parc-de-la-gatineau

La fermeture des promenades rend inaccessibles 377 espaces de stationnement répartis sur 13 sites différents qui se classent parmi les destinations les plus populaires à l’intérieur du parc :

1.    Le belvédère du lac Pink (9 espaces)

2.    Le sentier du lac Pink (40 espaces)

3.    Le sentier de la Chute (18 espaces)

4.    Le sentier Lauriault et aire de piquenique  (37 espaces)

5.    Le lac Mulvihill et aire de piquenique (30 espaces)

6.    Le sentier du mont King et aire de piquenique (42 espaces)

7.    Le lac Bourgeois (15 espaces)

8.    Le belvédère Huron (32 espaces)

9.    Le belvédère Étienne-Brûlé et aire de piquenique (35 espaces)

10.  Le relais Keogan (34 espaces)

11.  Le belvédère du Lac-Fortune (9 espaces)

12.  L’aire de piquenique du Pingouin (12 espaces)

13.  Le belvédère Champlain (64 espaces)

Source : https://ncc-ccn.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=3b0457a46ddd44beb47bd9550f97c33b&locale=fr 

Il ne subsiste aucun accès direct aux airs de piquenique du lac Mulvihill, du Pingouin et du mont King. La seule exception à la fermeture est de 13h à 30 minutes après le coucher du soleil le mercredi, le samedi ou le dimanche.

Sont bannies les randonnées de courte durée, y compris au lac Pink, au mont King, le sentier de la Chute, la boucle du belvédère Champlain ou au relais Western. Les restrictions d’accès à ces sites s’appliquent durant toute la matinée, 7 jours sur 7.

L’horaire en vigueur :

1.    Crée du favoritisme à l’égard d’utilisateurs en bonne santé, les « utilisateurs actifs » tels que définis par la CCN, qui utilisent l’asphalte des promenades, mais non les sentiers du parc comme tel.

2.    Constitue de la discrimination à l’endroit des personnes handicapées.

2.1  22% de la population canadienne, soit 8.3 M de personnes, considèrent être atteintes d’un handicap. Les handicaps les plus communs se rapportent à la mobilité, la douleur ou la flexibilité.

2.2  Le « capacitisme » peut se définir comme un système de croyances, semblable au racisme, au sexisme ou à l’âgisme, selon lequel une personne handicapée est moins digne d’être traitée avec respect et égard, moins apte à contribuer et à participer à la société ou moins importante intrinsèquement que les autres. Le capacitisme peut restreindre les possibilités offertes aux personnes handicapées et réduire leur participation à la vie de leur collectivité.

2.3  Les attitudes capacitistes reposent souvent sur l’idée selon laquelle le handicap est une « anomalie de la normalité », plutôt qu’une variante inhérente et anticipée de la condition humaine. Le capacitisme peut également prendre la forme de comportements paternalistes et condescendants à l’égard des personnes handicapées.

3.    Constitue de la discrimination à l’endroit des aînés

3.1  18% de la population canadienne, soit 6.8 M de personnes, sont âgées de 65 ans ou plus.

3.2  L’âgisme désigne deux concepts distincts: une construction sociale de l’esprit qui fait percevoir les personnes âgées à partir d’attitudes ou de stéréotypes négatifs ainsi qu’une tendance à structurer la société comme si tous étaient jeunes, ce qui empêche de répondre adéquatement aux besoins réels des personnes âgées.  

3.3  L’âgisme peut souvent être la cause d’actes isolés de discrimination fondée sur l’âge, mais aussi d’une discrimination dont la nature s’avère plus systémique, par exemple lors de la conception ou mise en œuvre de services, programmes ou installations.

4.    Constitue de la discrimination à l’endroit des familles avec de jeunes enfants. Les enfants sont plus actifs le matin et font la sieste en après-midi. Pendant toute la semaine, il n’y a aucun accès le matin. Rouler à vélo avec des enfants n’est pas une option en raison des pentes abruptes qui caractérisent le parcours des promenades. Piqueniquer au lac Mulvihill, au belvédère Étienne-Brûlé ou au mont King est hors de portée.

5.    Relègue au rang de citoyens de seconde classe les usagers qui pratiquent d’autres activités récréatives, par exemple les peintres, photographes ou observateurs d’oiseaux.

6.    Constitue de la discrimination à l’endroit des randonneurs et marcheurs de niveau moyen pour qui les sentiers accessibles à partir des voies municipales deviennent trop fastidieux, abruptes ou éloignés des destinations les plus populaires.

L’an dernier, ce même horaire a engendré l’encombrement des pistes de randonnée et la surcharge des parcs de stationnement durant les après-midis où les promenades étaient ouvertes à la circulation des véhicules motorisés. Visionnez cet encombrement extrême :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nEOLHsS8uQ

Nous n’avons rien contre la sécurité des cyclistes, bien au contraire, nous l’appuyons. Cependant, nous sommes contre la fermeture des accès au parc. La CCN peut réduire les limites de vitesse s’appliquant aux véhicules motorisés sur les promenades du parc de la Gatineau et voir à ce que la police en assure le respect. La CCN peut investir dans des voies adjacentes aux promenades réservées au cyclisme. 

Le parc de la Gatineau est le plus grand milieu naturel de la région de la capitale du Canada. Il est le parc de conservation par excellence de la capitale nationale. Les promenades du parc de la Gatineau ont été construites il y a plus de 60 ans, dans le but d’y attirer tous les Canadiens. Elles ne sont pas une piste d’entraînement réservée aux athlètes. Le parc doit demeurer inclusif et accessible pour tous les Canadiens, comme il l’était avant le début de la pandémie en 2020.

Nous demandons à la CCN de restaurer l’accès aux promenades du parc de la Gatineau tel qu’il se trouvait avant la pandémie.

Renseignements additionnels :

Voici comment le nouvel horaire a modifié l’accès au parc de la Gatineau. Pour atteindre les destinations mentionnées ci-dessous, il faut conduire jusqu’à des parcs de stationnement qui sont situés en périphérie du parc, accessibles par des voies municipales. Pendant les fermetures, le seul parc de stationnement disponible quand on arrive par le secteur Sud est le P3, situé à l’entrée du secteur. 

·      La longueur du trajet aller-retour pour se rendre à pied au lac Pink à partir du stationnement P2 ou du stationnement payant P6 est respectivement de 6.6 km ou 7.6 km. La seule option possible quand on arrive par le secteur Sud  est de marcher sur la promenade de la Gatineau à partir du stationnement P3 jusqu’au lac Pink, un trajet aller-retour de 14.6 km.

·      Pour se rendre au belvédère Champlain à pied, il faut soit partir du stationnement payant P12, ce qui représente un trajet additionnel de 8.2 à 10.2 km, comprenant un certain nombre de sentiers difficiles, soit partir du stationnement payant P6, ce qui représente un trajet aller-retour additionnel de 17.4 km. La seule option à partir du stationnement P3 est de marcher sur les promenades de la Gatineau et Champlain, un trajet aller-retour de 36.6 km.

·      Une randonnée au relais Western requiert maintenant un trajet additionnel de 8.2 à 10.2 km  comprenant un certain nombre de sentiers difficiles, à partir du stationnement payant P12.

·      Une randonnée au mont King requiert maintenant un trajet aller-retour additionnel de 4.2 km sur des pistes accessibles à partir du stationnement P7. Aucune piste ne donne un accès direct à partir du stationnement payant P6, de sorte qu’une randonnée à partir ce stationnement ajoute un trajet aller-retour de 7km, dont une portion sur le pavé de la promenade Champlain. La seule option si on entre par le secteur Sud  est de marcher sur les promenades de la Gatineau et Champlain à partir du stationnement P3, un trajet aller-retour de 26 km.

·      Une randonnée au belvédère Étienne-Brûlé requiert maintenant un trajet additionnel aller-retour de 9.2 km à partir du stationnement payant P12 ou de 10.6 km à partir du stationnement P10. La seule option si on entre par le secteur Sud est de marcher sur les promenades de la Gatineau et Champlain à partir du stationnement P3, un trajet aller-retour de 36 km.

De plus, si à partir d’un espace de stationnement pour personnes handicapées on désire se rendre en marchant ou roulant sur le pavé des promenades du parc de la Gatineau à l’un ou l’autre des sites mentionnés ci-dessous, le parcours se dresse ainsi :

·      Le stationnement le plus près du stationnement du belvédère du lac Pink est le P3 (à l’entrée du secteur Sud), un trajet de 6.1 km avec une élévation de 113 m, soit pour un bon marcheur un aller simple de 1 heure et 19 minutes.

·      Le stationnement le plus près du  belvédère Champlain est le P10 (Fortune), un trajet de 6.2 km avec une élévation de 142 m, soit pour un bon marcheur un aller simple de 1 heure et 21 minutes.

·      Le stationnement le plus près du mont King/aire de piquenique du lac Black est le P6 (Domaine Mackenzie King), un trajet de 3.7 km avec une élévation de 101 m, soit pour un bon marcheur un aller simple de 50 minutes, sans compter qu’il faut transporter le matériel de piquenique.

Remarque : Étant donné qu’aucune piste d’accès universel se rend à ces sites, les distances données ci-dessus sont les plus courtes possible en empruntant l’une ou l’autre des promenades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 have signed. Let’s get to 7,500!
At 7,500 signatures, this petition is more likely to get a reaction from the decision maker!