Petition Closed

Google Doodles have become iconic and universal, and we believe that they should reflect the diversity of the world Google serves.

As young women of color growing up in the United States, finding representations of ourselves in the media and elsewhere is tough. We want to hear the stories of people like us celebrated and told around the world.

Women and people of color have made many strides throughout history, but we don’t get to hear about most of their extraordinary contributions to society. If you paid attention in history class in school, you would think the only people to do anything of significance in the United States or around the world have been white men. But it’s not just in school- whether it’s in television or movies, the vast majority of young people rarely have the chance to learn what women and people of color have contributed to history.

One way we all learn history is through Google Doodles. Google isn’t just a company anymore; it’s the most visited website in the world and, in many ways, symbolizes the change and growth of our modern society. Google plays a significant role in how and what young people learn, and especially prides itself on the company’s motto: “Do no evil.” But here are some facts that we have discovered through our research:

1. Until 2013, there were no women of color in global doodles.

2. Although women make up more than 50% of the world’s population, they’ve made up only 17% of Google Doodles from 2010 to 2013.

3. White people are a minority in the worldwide population, yet they occupy 91% of global doodles dedicated to honoring specific persons from 2010 to 2013.

4. Out of the already disproportionately small number of doodles honoring people of color, women of color in particular represent only 19% (that’s just 4.3% of all doodles honoring specific persons!).

Google says that its doodle selection process aims to reflect the company’s “personality and love for innovation,” but by drastically underrepresenting women and people of color Google reinforces the terrible myth that all of the world’s most significant discoveries have been strictly made by white men. The truth is that women and people of color have been among some of the greatest inventors, artists, authors, revolutionaries and creators the world has ever seen. We believe Google Doodles should reflect the diversity of its audience.

That’s why we’re asking Google to be more diverse in their representation of the world’s historical figures and commit to partnering with us as they go forward with that effort. Join us by signing this petition and asking Google to make doodles that better represent the diversity of the world we live in.

Mehar Gujral, 17

Katy Ma, 17

Celeste Montaño, 20

SPARK Movement

Letter to
Google
Give us “Doodles Like Us”