Petition Closed

One of Tasmania’s last and most beautiful areas of wilderness is about to be subjected to nine “Pilbara-style” open cut mines -- and if the mining companies have their way, the government won’t even consider the potentially devastating environmental impact of the mines before deciding to approve. Tony Burke can stop this if he grants national heritage status immediately.

The Tarkine forest is recognised as one of the most significant of its kind on earth -- its leafy canopy and undisturbed terrain are home to over 50 endangered plants and animals, including the Tasmanian Devil. But despite countless recommendations and a World Heritage nomination, it still has no status -- and therefore the government has no legal grounds for recognising its natural value.

There’s only one thing standing in the mining companies’ way. This week, the Tarkine Forest could be declared National Heritage by Environment Minister Tony Burke -- a move which would force the government to conduct a comprehensive environmental impact assessment before approving any mines.

Please help convince Tony Burke to fulfil his role as environment minister, and grant this vital national heritage status -- it’s the only thing that will protect the forest from unbridled exploitation and degradation at the hands of miners.

Letter to
Federal Environment Minister Tony Burke
The Tarkine is one of Tasmania’s last and most beautiful areas of wilderness. Currently there are ten proposed mines and 56 licenses for exploration in this area -- but there are no legal grounds for the government to weigh environmental concerns against economic benefits because the Tarkine doesn’t have national heritage status. I call on you to grant this status urgently, so that upcoming mining applications are assessed alongside national heritage criteria.

The Tarkine forest is recognised as one of the most significant of its kind on earth -- its leafy canopy and undisturbed terrain are home to over 50 endangered plants and animals, including the Tasmanian Devil.

Open cut mining would have potentially devastating effects on waterways, animals and plants. Land is cleared through blasting and bulldozing, and the mining process itself produces large quantities of highly toxic waste that can leach acid into surrounds for thousands of years. Similar mines in NSW have raised serious concerns about the pollution of underground aquifers, the literal lifeblood of forests like the Tarkine.

The Australian Heritage Council has already made a recommendation for national heritage listing, and the Tarkine has been granted emergency listings in the past. I call on you to grant the Tarkine national heritage status immediately, so that its immense natural value can be considered when the government assesses mining applications.

Sincerely,