Petition Closed
Petitioning European Union

Adopt the UN/OECD Guidelines to stop Electronics from Funding War in Congo


The consumption of electronic products is directly fuelling conflict and sexual violence against women and men by funding armed groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), thus helping to perpetuate the deadliest conflict since World War II.

We are calling on the European Union to introduce regulations requiring companies to implement the United Nations / Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains, which provide a blueprint for companies to help eliminate conflict minerals from their products.

Rebels, militia and abusive units of the Congolese army are making fortunes by exploiting four key minerals (tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold ores) that often end up in the circuit boards and capacitors of electronic devices sold throughout the European Union. Opaque international supply chains enable these ‘conflict minerals’ to make their way from rebel-controlled mines to a wide range of consumer electronics, notably mobile phones and computers.

In January, 2012, the European Commission (EC) issued a Trade and Development Communication which announced support for the UN/OECD guidelines, stating that “we will advocate greater support for and use of the… OECD’s recommendations on due diligence and responsible supply chain management.” In 2010 and 2011, the European Parliament passed two resolutions calling for the EC to propose conflict minerals legislation.

Our petition is calling on European policy makers to follow up on this momentum by adopting concrete solutions.

Please join us in this effort by signing this petition to the EU, so that the Congo’s resources can be used to promote peace and development.

Letter to
European Union
I just signed the following petition addressed to: European Union.

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The consumption of electronic products is directly fuelling conflict and sexual violence against women and men by funding armed groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), thus helping to perpetuate the deadliest conflict since World War II.

We are calling on the European Union to introduce regulations requiring companies to implement the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains.

Rebels, militia and abusive units of the Congolese army are making fortunes by exploiting four key minerals (tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold ores) that often end up in the circuit boards and capacitors of electronic devices sold throughout the European Union. Opaque international supply chains enable these ‘conflict minerals’ to make their way from rebel-controlled mines to a wide range of consumer electronics, notably mobile phones and computers.

Originally drafted by the United Nations, the guidelines were refined in May, 2011, by the OECD and provide a detailed framework for companies to create transparency in their supply chains, so they can know if their minerals are helping finance the war in eastern Congo. It has received considerable buy-in from numerous multinational companies, countries and advocacy organizations. In July, 2011, the Congolese government urged the U.S.’ Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) to adopt the guidelines as part of the U.S. Dodd-Frank regulations, and in October issued a directive requiring companies operating in the Congo to adhere to the UN/OECD guidelines.

In January, 2012, the European Commission issued a Trade and Development Communication which announced support for the UN/OECD guidelines, stating that “we will advocate greater support for and use of the… OECD’s recommendations on due diligence and responsible supply chain management – something we need to promote beyond OECD countries as well.” In 2010 and 2011, the European Parliament passed two resolutions calling for the EC to propose conflict minerals legislation.

Formally adopting the UN/OECD guidelines would help European consumers know the origins of their electronic products, and help promote peace in eastern Congo.

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Sincerely,