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Petitioning Mike Coupe Sainsbury’s Group Chief Executive, Sainsbury's

Sainsbury’s: don’t ditch Fairtrade!

Sainsbury's is the largest retailer of Fairtrade products in the UK. But they’ve decided to drop the Fairtrade Mark from their own-brand tea and replace it with their own 'Fairly Traded' label instead. Sainsbury’s has abandoned Fairtrade certification to set up its own pilot scheme, saying they want to secure their supply chain. ‘Fairly Traded’ sounds a lot like Fairtrade, but it doesn’t have the same gold standards. It is self-run by Sainsbury’s but most importantly it takes control away from tea farmers. The new scheme is untested, unverified and unwanted and the ‘Fairly Traded’ label is likely to mislead customers. I’ve started this petition because we can’t let Sainsbury’s undermine Fairtrade’s incredible impact on the lives of millions of farmers. 'Fairly Traded' is not my cup of tea! Over 220,000 tea producers are affected by Sainsbury’s decision and their concerns about it have been blatantly ignored. In an open letter to Sainsbury’s*, farmers said: ‘We told Sainsbury’s loud and clear: your model will bring about disempowerment. We are extremely concerned about the power and control that Sainsbury’s seeks to exert over us.’ Under the pilot scheme, the cash bonus that farmers receive on top of what they earn for their tea (similar to the Fairtrade Premium) no longer goes directly to them. Instead, their money is held by Sainsbury’s, who have instructed farmers to apply to a Board in London to find out whether they can have it.  I’ve supported Fairtrade for many years because it is an internationally respected, farmer-owned certification scheme with over 20 years of experience fighting for a fairer deal for millions of farmers in developing countries. Fairtrade ensures that a company’s supply chain is independently checked against farmer-set standards. That’s why the Fairtrade Mark is the most recognised and trusted ethical label in the world. So please sign this petition and tell Sainsbury’s Chief Executive Mike Coupe: don’t ditch Fairtrade! If we make it very clear we only support Fairtrade tea, we can make him reconsider.  This petition is supported by: Oxfam, Cafod, Christian Aid, Traidcraft Exchange, Tearfund, Trade Justice Movement and Commitment for Life. *You can read the open letter from tea farmers to Sainsbury’s here.

Barbara Gwinnett
94,662 supporters
Petitioning Tesco, asda, Sainsbury's, MORRISONS

Add a "Donate to Foodbank" option for Online Supermarket Shopping

Like many people short of time (also being disabled), I tend to opt for online shopping. I was thinking yesterday: "Wouldn't it be great if there was a "donate to food bank" option on supermarket websites?" I was forced into food poverty when I was young, as a result of a benefits sanction (where my income support was cut as a penalty). Having experienced what it is like not to know how you are going to pay for your next meal, I want to do what I can to help others that have ended up in a similar situation. I cannot imagine how people cope with a complete stop of income support, job seekers allowance or other benefits. Still in the UK today there are mums skipping dinner to feed their kids, and teens forced to pick between lunch and sanitary products. I know that Supermarkets try to offer us easy opportunities to help - I’ve seen food bank collection points in store. But the world is so much more digital now - wouldn’t it be fantastic if they offered this option online too?! I have tweeted this to Waitrose, Sainsbury's, Tesco, Asda and Morrisons: Sainsbury's and Morrisons have both got back to me to say they think this a really interesting idea and that they'll look into it. I think we enough public support we can convince them to do it! I wanted to set up this petition to show the supermarkets there are lots of people out there who support this. And I am sure it would massively increase donations to food banks. One day, food banks will hopefully be a thing of the past. At least, that's my hope. In the meantime,  all I can do is try to help increase donations and make  it easier for other people to do so. So, if you think this is a good idea, please add your name to my petition.  And supermarkets (Tesco, Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury's) this is YOUR consumers asking you to please please, help us help others, by adding a “donate to food bank button” onto your websites.

Caroline Macdonald
45,576 supporters
Closed
Petitioning Tesco, MORRISONS, Sainsbury's, asda, Waitrose, Co-operative food

Tesco - Let's see non-plastic water alternatives in your stores!

Hello. We’re sisters Amy and Ella Meek and we’re 13 and 11 years old. Earlier this year, we founded our campaign Kids Against Plastic (inspired by the UN’s Global Goals for Sustainable Development), urging UK supermarkets, like TESCO, to stock non-plastic water alternatives. Why? Because every day, the Earth's valuable and depleting virgin non-renewable resources are used in the manufacture of single-plastic bottles that are filled with water for sale in our supermarkets. These plastic bottles are having a catastrophic effect on the planet. Most single-use plastic bottles are probably only used for about 10 - 15 minutes before they are discarded, mainly indirectly into either landfill, incineration centres or into the environment. Plastic bottles stay around on the planet FOREVER, and only break down into smaller pieces - 'microplastics' - instead of biodegrading (they’re fully man-made items). These microplastics (and larger bottles as well, of course) often make their way into the oceans, where they float around absorbing harmful chemicals in the surrounding water. Then, they're mistaken for food and are eaten by sea creatures, and the toxins enter their bodies. We humans eat these fish, and… well, the toxins in the fish enter our blood streams and can mix up women’s hormones, and even cause cancer. Alternatively, while being broken down, plastic bottle fragments and, more often, bottle tops are collected by birds that think they are food and are fed to young chicks. These poor, innocent birds then die an agonising death, starving with a full stomach.  And yet, the bottled water companies try to cover up the effect their plastic bottles have on the planet. They like us to think that the bottles they make are made from recycled plastic, when they are not. Even the big players like Britvic (who make water such as Drench and Ballygowan) and Nestlé (Nestlé Water and Buxton Water) use zero post-consumer recycled PET plastic in their bottles. Every new bottle they make is made from new resources. The 'Fully recyclable' logo we see on bottles is a red herring, because most bottles don't even make it to a plastic recycling centre. Those that do often don't actually get recycled into new bottles (it's too expensive), but 'down cycled' into lower grade plastic products like fleeces and carpets.  To top all this off, plastic bottles are practically unnecessary, since we live in a country where the tap water is mostly safe to drink. Worse still, any environmentally conscious consumers wanting to purchase packaged water from shops and supermarkets, we are not even given the option to make environmentally responsible choices. That’s right: non of the main supermarket chains currently widely stock non-plastic bottled water alternatives, despite the fact that there are a growing number of reputable sources available: Vivid Water in a Box, Aquapax, CanO Water and Ugly Water (to name a few). Instead, their shelves are full of row upon row of single-use plastic bottles.  If the supermarkets like TESCO give us more choices to buy non-plastic bottled water alternatives (such as cartons, boxes or cans) then we will see a win-win situation -- we will benefit as consumers, and the Earth will benefit from a reduction in the use and abuse of single-use plastic bottles.  This is why we must have the options to purchase environmentally friendly alternatives to plastic bottles. Please don’t leave us – the future generation – with a problem on our hands that it’s too late to fix. Make Tesco change now. Please sign our petition and share with other like-minded people, and together we can make a difference.  Thanks for taking the time to read this, and thanks for caring.

Tim Meek
5,640 supporters
Petitioning sainsburys

Save Sainsbury Cat Cardiff from expulsion

Sainsburys Thornhill, Cardiff are banning a cat from its foyer for health and safety reasons She has been visiting there for over a year . She does no harm and never enters the store She is quite a character and has a following on Facebook The majority of customers love her She brings a smile to our faces We want ban removed

jennifer robinson
1,510 supporters
Petitioning Sainsbury's

Save Giraffes with profits from Giraffe Bread

Today, giraffes were put on the endangered species list. There are fewer than 100,000 left. A few years ago, Sainsbury's started selling giraffe bread, after a three year old wrote them a letter pointing out that tiger bread looks way more like a giraffe than a tiger. They agreed, and changed the name. They've called it giraffe bread ever since. Now, giraffes need our help. I think Sainsbury's should donate a month's profits on giraffe bread to the Giraffe Conservation Foundation to help make sure these wonderful animals don't go extinct.  

Russell Warfield
1,401 supporters
Petitioning Sainsbury's, mike.coupe@sainsburys.co.uk

Sainsbury's please do more to support your loyal allergy customers

#sainsburysmaycontainnuts. Living with food allergies is extremely difficult. As a mum with a young child who has severe allergies to peanuts, treenuts, milk and egg, I know first hand how much of an impact living with food allergies has on your day to day life. I know first hand the challenges my daughter faces - I have lost count of the times she has missed out or been excluded because food has not been safe. In nursery, in school, at birthday parties or other functions. Eating out is a mine field. As is booking holidays. Nothing is simple.  So you can imagine how wonderful it is to find safe foods that are not only healthy and nutritious but also tasty. My daughter is 7. Like ever other 7 year old she loves treats...ice cream, sweeties, chocolates and desserts. She likes cereals just like the ones that her friends eat. She doesn't like to stand out. We work hard at providing her with a balanced diet, but it can be extremely difficult at times. Reading every label in every shop is not only time consuming, but it is also so disheartening - checking a packet while an excited 7 year old watches you, only to tell them that, no, this isn't safe, is heartbreaking. It’s not just about having a treat, it’s about inclusion, feeling normal…not sticking out. We all know what that feels like don’t we? In the UK, it is estimated that 1-2% of adults and 5-8% of children have a food allergy. This equates to around 2 million people living in the UK with a food allergy and this figure does not include those with food intolerances. This means the actual number of affected people living with a food allergy and/or food intolerance is considerably more. We know that food allergies are on the rise and that more people than ever before are affected by them.  So, why then is is becoming increasingly difficult to shop for safe foods? Why is it that so many foods that we previously ate safely are no longer considered to be safe for us? Why is it that retailers are not taking food allergy customers into consideration when making decisions in relation to where they produce products. Why is it that more and more we are seeing the statement "may contain nuts" appear on products which DO NOT contain nuts? Products that were once safe, but are no longer, because retailers are not taking the time to think about the implication of their decisions on a group of customers who are affected by allergies, specifically to peanuts and treenuts.  Sainsbury's is one of the UK's largest food retailers and for many years has been seen by allergy communities as being "allergy friendly" - it was viewed as a supermarket that you could trust to label well (using the term "may contain" when there is a genuine risk) and also as a supermarket where there were lots of options for peanut and treenuts allergy sufferers, as well as many other allergy sufferers. Their Free From section was excellent, providing a selection of products that were safe for people with multiple allergies. We have always relied on the free from chocolate range. However, over the past few months, customers have started to find that products that have been safe for many years are no longer safe - breakfast cereals, desserts, breads and the free from chocolate range, are no longer safe because they now carry a "may contain nuts warning".  As far as I am aware, Sainsbury's have changed the labelling on so many products because they now have new suppliers and the products are now being produced in factories where there is a risk of cross contamination. While we are grateful that Sainsbury's are labelling for this risk, we are extremely disappointed that Sainsbury's have taken the decision to make these changes without taking into consideration the large group of loyal allergy customers who not only enjoy their products, but rely on them to provide their families with a balanced diet.  My little girl is devastated that so many of the products that she was once able to eat safely are no longer an option for her. And I know that we are not alone.  To make matters worse, Sainsbury's are no longer responding to correspondence in relation to this issue. They are ignoring their loyal customers. At a time when we need clarity about what is happening and also additional information about the new allergy advice, as a group we are being ignored. We are not even clear which nuts are presenting a risk in the new production sites.  I am calling on Sainsbury's to reconsider the changes that they have recently made. I do not underestimate the time and cost involved in changing suppliers. However, as a parent to a young child with severe, life threatening, allergies, I am asking that you consider the impact that this change has had on a large number of your loyal customers.   

Emma Bilsland
1,137 supporters
Petitioning Tesco, Oatly , Alpro, Sainsbury's

For retailers to start selling dairy and soya free yogurts and milks for children

Approximately 5-7% of children are diagnosed with cows milk allergy each year. This means that approximately 48,000 parents are having to keep their children on a dairy free diet. It's estimated that 30-50% of these children are also allergic to soya. Yet currently there are no dairy and soya free yogurts or milks marketed for children (there are dairy and soya free yogurts marketed for adults but these don't contain added calcium and the vitamins necessary for children. Only Koko sells dairy and soya free yogurts with added calcium, but the size of the tubs are not practical for toddlers). There is currently only one dairy free milk for under 3s on the market, but this is Soya based (alpro growing up 1+). This petition is asking Oatly/Tesco/Alpro/Sainsto start selling products suitable for children with cows milks and soya allergies. Tesco and Alpro have a large range of yogurts, all soya based. Oatly's barista milks are widely used for children with a milk allergy as it's the alternative milk with the highest level of fat content in the UK. But we would love a milk that's specifically tailored to children and one that's also available in small 200ml cartons so we have options like any other mum to pop out (currently the small cartons don't have calcium or enough fat content for children). Please can you give these children the same opportunity as those without allergies. This would also enable vegan mums to buy yogurts and puddings for their children. In the UK the vegan community has risen by 360% in the last 10 years and this would likely be a welcome move for vegan parents.

Adel Klaudia
555 supporters
Petitioning Tesco, MORRISONS, asda, Sainsbury's, CO-OP, aldi, Lidl, Waitrose, Ocado, Marks & Spencer

Stop Using E904 Shellac Wax On Fruit!

A lot of the fruit and veg on the shelves at your local supermarket are not vegan or vegetarian friendly... Shocking, I know, to find out that your plant based diet cannot include fruit because it's coated with shellac! Many vegetables and all fruits produce their own waxy coating. This natural plant wax, inhibits mould growth; slows down the natural degradation of the fruit; reduces the loss of moisture; and provides a physical barrier that protects the fruit from some microorganisms. This natural wax is often wholly or partially removed once harvested fruits and vegetables have been washed. The plants' own wax is often replaced by shellac (E904) which is a resin secreted by the female lac bug. However there are plant derived alternatives, such as carnauba wax, and some supermarkets stock unwaxed fruits but they are hard to come across. As a vegan, I personally feel that all animal products are unnecessary. But not being able to eat plants whilst having a strictly plant based diet is completely silly! So I'm asking all supermarkets to switch over to plant based waxes/unwaxed, to label the ingredients of the coating on the fruit (if any), and to start labelling their fruit as non-vegan/suitable for vegans. Image source:Information print screened from: http://elated.co.za/which-e-numbers-are-vegan/Image of female lac bug: http://antiqueoutings.com/bakelite-history/

Isobella DeMartino
517 supporters
Closed
Petitioning Sainsbury's

Save Stapleford Sainsbury's Store

Sainsbury's Local, Central Avenue, Stapleford is set to close in June 2016. Situated next to an Old Folks Complex it is an essential service to many people. As well as employing local people. We are asking Sainsbury's to reconsider the decision and keep the store open.

Stapleford Community Group
441 supporters
Petitioning Tesco, Sainsbury's, asda, MORRISONS, CO-OP, Steven Joseph Chairman of Candyland, Marks & Spencer, Waitrose, Haribo

Make your classic sweets vegan friendly!

Many of the sweets we knew and loved as children aren't suitable for people who follow ethical or religious diets. By signing this petition, you will help to ask the producers of classic sweets, such as foam bananas, pink shrimps, foam eggs, white mice, white and brown jems (jazzies), and all those other favorites, to make them suitable for vegan diets. They could easily have their gelatine replaced with pectin, and their milk replaced with soy or another alternative.Lets not let these classic sweets die out with the next generation of vegetarians, vegans and people with religious based diets.Please Candyland, Tesco, ASDA, Morrisons, Sainsbury's, Marks and Spencers, Waitrose, Haribo... we want to enjoy sweeties too!

AJ Stratton
223 supporters
Sainsbury’s: don’t ditch Fairtrade!

Thank you for contacting us about our Fairly Traded pilot on tea and the very important issue of how best to support our farmers, growers and their communities across the world. Firstly, you may be surprised to hear that I’m pleased so many of you have signed this petition. It shows the strength of feeling that exists for businesses to source ethically and sustainably. I also welcome the opportunity to respond and set the record straight. At Sainsbury’s ethical and sustainable sourcing has always been, and remains, at the heart of our business. We believe we have a responsibility to our farmers, their families and communities to provide them with the very best long-term support to build strong and resilient businesses and continuously improve their quality of life. And we don’t just say this. We act on it – day in, day out, by always listening to our farmers to understand their views and concerns and by always seeking to stay ahead of issues and develop new approaches where we believe they will create positive impact. Major concerns for our farmers today include the increasing impact of climate change on their crops, intensifying global competition, geo-political uncertainty and being disconnected from the end market for their crops. These are severely affecting their businesses and communities and put their quality of life at risk. In response to these escalating concerns we announced a new pilot project in May, called Fairly Traded, a trial which involves working closely with our tea farmers and their communities in East Africa to see if we can together better address these issues with a new approach – an approach that remains based on the 10 principles of Fair Trade but builds on existing models. The pilot approach will deliver the same or more financial benefits as those offered under the Fairtrade model, including an absolute guarantee of the minimum price and matched level of social premium for farmers to invest in their businesses and communities – but crucially, it also provides new benefits, such as long-term commitments of up to 3 years as well as access to enhanced data, information and expert support on the ground – tailored to their individual needs. If you would like to know more about how Fairly Traded works just visit http://www.about.sainsburys.co.uk/discover-more/fairly-traded But also please allow me to directly address the questions and concerns raised by this petition: • Firstly, we’re not making any more money because of this change. The pilot will be cost neutral and, if anything, will cost Sainsbury’s more to operate. Our customers will also see no change in the price of tea. However our farmers, their families and communities will see significant extra benefits and support. And that’s what truly matters. • All of our farmers involved in the pilot are wholly supportive. They can see the potential benefits of the combination of increased funding and additional support that our scheme will provide. If you see criticism of the pilot from farmers, I can assure they are not farmers who supply Sainsbury’s and as such are not farmers involved in the pilot scheme. • It’s also really important to state that we’re guaranteeing our farmers exactly the same level of funding as the existing scheme, and we expect to increase this funding further. The way the application process has been described is also misleading. As you would expect the scheme has safeguards in place to ensure that this funding is received by those it is intended for, but it is absolutely our farmers’ money for them to invest in their businesses and communities. No funding is being removed – if anything it will increase. • We’ve also had some questions about the Standards we are working to. These have been co-authored by leading Standards agency, SAI Global, and peer-reviewed by 50 independent experts. Our Standards will be independently audited by NSF International to the highest levels and we will publish the results annually. This goes beyond the requirements of the existing Fairtrade model. • We have been discussing this pilot with the Fairtrade Foundation for over two years and have always sought to collaborate on the development programme. Our door remains open to our long-standing partner to further discuss working together on the pilot for the best interests of our farmers, their families and communities. We remain the world’s biggest retailer of Fairtrade products. • Farmers in the developing world are facing unprecedented challenges. More of the same just isn’t enough anymore. As our ambition is to go above and beyond what farmers, their families and communities currently receive, isn’t it a positive step to try something new? Our pilot is exactly that, a pilot, and testing a new approach cannot be a bad thing. The work we’re doing is based on 10 plus years of experience with our Farm Development Groups in the UK and through our Fair Development Fund work with Comic Relief. I would urge you to wait to see what results we can deliver before making judgments. • One final point, we do not pretend to have all the answers to the complex issues that our farmers and growers are facing. But we do have their full support to launch this trial and test what can be done to provide an even better future for some of the world’s poorest communities. I think it must be recognised that the easy choice by far in these resource constrained times would be for Sainsbury’s to maintain the status quo. But, put simply, we don’t see more of the same as an option in the face of the escalating challenges facing our farmers and their communities. That’s why we’ve launched our Fairly Traded tea pilot, and that’s why we ask to be judged on our results. Best wishes, Mike Coupe Group Chief Executive Sainsbury's PLC

2 days ago