Topic

Net Neutrality

100 petitions

Update posted 1 week ago

Petition to Comcast, AT&T

The Lie of Comcast Data Caps

In an increasingly cloud connected and IoT world, we are faced with a conundrum. Many of the population of the U.S.A live in an area where the is either a functional duopoly or monopoly on internet connections or has limited access to internet at all. In my area in West Michigan we have two choices, AT&T (which is VERY slow ~15mbps AND has data caps) or Comcast (which has data caps). So Comcast is the only real option for a true high-speed connection. In a world where games no longer come on disks, but are available ONLY as downloads, this 1024 GB usage limit is a reverse in modernization of our ISPs and a clear money grab by a company that does NOT care about the customer, but only their bottom line. To put 1024 GB into perspective, Gears of War 4, has a download size of over 100GB, so you could use up 10% of your available data on ONE game. When the rest of your family is streaming music, Netflix in 4K, Youtube, Hulu, downloading/uploading images, or as a photography professional, uploading RAW images which could range in 30-50MB EACH, you can see where this begins to be a problem.  To be clear, I am 100% pro capitalism, but this is how capitalism works, they have a choice to make ridiculous and anti-consumer decisions in their policies, and we have a choice to fight it or leave. In this case there is no real option to leave, so we will have to fight it! Comcast claims, arbitrarily, "A terabyte of data is enough to power 12,000 hours of online gaming in a month." This is a vast overstatement, and a total misdirection for the average consumer. This data is a number that THEY came up with, does not include voice chat over services like Teamspeak, Mumble, Discord, etc, and does not include streaming to Twitch. It also does not include ANY other use of the internet, including updating those games that you are playing, which require frequent updates to even start up, or any other usage or streaming on the internet by anyone else in the house. Another claim by Comcast is that this is about "fairness" and that "you use more, you'll pay more, you use less, you'll pay less" but again, this is at best a misdirection, and at worst a total lie. Those who use less are not paying less, they are paying the same that we all already have been paying, and are only increasing the cost for those of us who utilize their internet connections everyday. Also, the amount of data you are using does not affect Comcast in anyway and does not increase costs to Comcast at all. This is completely and unequivocally a money grab. In conclusion, as more and more things become internet connected, video becomes higher quality, games get larger, and more people have more than 1 device connected at a time, this data cap sets a dangerous precedent for everyone, and not just "the 1% of users use more than 1TB of data" as our worlds become increasingly connected. This can turn into what the cellphone industry turned into, paying for different amount of data access, and no one wants that, except money hungry Comcast!  

Anthony Punt
369 supporters
Update posted 1 month ago

Petition to Federal Communications Commission, U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Save Net Neutrality

The ability to organize grassroots movements, whether locally or across the globe, is made possible by an open Internet. Since its creation, the Internet has become the world’s megaphone for free speech, protected by the principles of Net Neutrality, which require internet service providers (ISPs) to give everyone equal access to everything you use the internet for -- email, watching videos, listening to music, or signing petitions on Change.org.  Without Net Neutrality, ISPs can choose what you see online, favoring some sources or blocking others. For example, if someone launched a petition on Change.org against a company like Verizon, Net Neutrality prevents Verizon from blocking or slowing their customers’ access to our site.   In December of 2017, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted 3-2 to repeal net neutrality rules -- giving big cable companies room to charge extra fees, block and censor users. By removing ISPs from Title II of the Communications Act, a rule that means ISPs are subjected to tougher regulations that prevent them blocking sites, creating paid “fast” lanes, and throttling internet speeds. This decision will have global implications for the way the world shares and receives information from journalists, newsrooms, and NGO’s. However, following the FCC’s vote, Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.) announced a Congressional Review Act resolution that if passed, would stop net neutrality repeal. That resolution now has the support of 50 senate members, which means just one more vote is needed for it to pass the Senate. Net Neutrality also prevents ISPs from creating paid “fast lanes” that would give faster delivery of content to companies who can afford to pay more. An organization or platform like Change.org that couldn’t afford those fees, couldn’t communicate with their supporters.  In the United States, there is strong bipartisan support for Net Neutrality. A recent poll conducted by Mozilla found that Republicans, Democrats and Independents overwhelmingly support these rules.  At Change.org, we believe that people everywhere should have the tools they need to make their voices heard. We’re a social good company powered by technology that empowers anyone anywhere to take action on the issues they care about. A closed off Internet means fewer ways for millions of people to make the change they want to see. Without an internet equally accessible to everyone regardless of income or geography, we can’t continue that mission. Add your name to let Congress and the FCC know that you support an open internet.

Change.org
2,410,296 supporters