Topic

Net Neutrality

70 petitions

Update posted 14 hours ago

Petition to Ajit Pai, Donald Trump, Cheryl King

Internet Privacy and Net Neutrality

While many of you may think that you are secure on the internet, none of you are. How many of you have a Gmail? How about a Google plus or a twitter account? YouTube? These programs are tracking you. Public law 115-22, passed on April 3, takes privacy protection to a whole new level. On December 16, 2016, the Obama administration and The FCC (Federal Communications Commission), passed a law relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services”, or FCC 16-148. While you can feel free to Google that, it’s a 72-page document, so I’ll just give you the gist of it. This new law protected Net Neutrality and customer privacy. Internet Service providers such as Verizon now had to protect their subscribers from cyberattacks, report any cyberattacks, protect their subscriber’s privacy, and could not sell user data. Consider this: you pay for Internet. You don’t pay for Google or Twitter. Google and twitter’s services are free. Google only makes $32 dollars off you. If you had been willing to pay just $32, you could get Google without trackers! But in the early 2000’s, the consumers decided that they didn’t want to pay for internet services. So, websites like Tripod (The precursor of Myspace, which was the precursor of Facebook, etc.), started placing ads on their pages. This worked great for a while, up until some executive decided that they could make more money if they targeted specific users. (Ad Networks pay-per-click, which means the more clicks on an ad, the more the website makes.) And so tracking was born! But back to Public law 115-22. No only does this law remove online privacy protections, but it also means that ISPs no longer have to report cyberattacks, so your passwords, Social Security Number, and more could be compromised, and Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, Bell, or whatever ISP you use, wouldn’t even have to tell you! And guess what? That data that ISPs now have access to means that they are making even more money by selling your data that you pay them to acquire. Not to mention, Net Neutrality is down the toilet as well, which means that the internet could be more like a TV service, where you pay for individual sites, or websites like Netflix would have to pay to deliver their content to customers on that ISP. So what can you do? You can sign my petition, or talk to your local congressman. And to protect your data, you can sign up for a VPN like Tunnel Bear, or use TOR, i2p, or freenet. You can also look for a green lock on the upper left hand corner of your browser to ensure that the site that you are browsing is secure. But most importantly, you need to stay aware of what you are sharing online, and who you are sharing it with. And remember, your data isn’t yours anymore when it’s on the Internet.  

Daniel Meskin
196,918 supporters
Decision maker responded 3 days ago

Petition to Federal Communications Commission, U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Save Net Neutrality

The ability to organize grassroots movements, whether locally or across the globe, is made possible by an open Internet. Since its creation, the Internet has become the world’s megaphone for free speech, protected by the principles of Net Neutrality, which require internet service providers (ISPs) to give everyone equal access to everything you use the internet for -- email, watching videos, listening to music, or signing petitions on Change.org.  Without Net Neutrality, ISPs can choose what you see online, favoring some sources or blocking others. For example, if someone launched a petition on Change.org against a company like Verizon, Net Neutrality prevents Verizon from blocking or slowing their customers’ access to our site.   The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is moving to end Net Neutrality -- which could mean giving big cable companies room to charge extra fees, block and censor users -- by removing ISPs from Title II of the Communications Act, a rule that means ISPs are subjected to tougher regulations that prevent them blocking sites, creating paid “fast” lanes, and throttling internet speeds. This decision could have global implications for the way the world shares and receives information from journalists, newsrooms, and NGO’s. Net Neutrality also prevents ISPs from creating paid “fast lanes” that would give faster delivery of content to companies who can afford to pay more. An organization or platform like Change.org that couldn’t afford those fees, couldn’t communicate with their supporters.  In the United States, there is strong bipartisan support for Net Neutrality. A recent poll conducted by Mozilla found that Republicans, Democrats and Independents overwhelmingly support these rules.  At Change.org, we believe that people everywhere should have the tools they need to make their voices heard. We’re a social good company powered by technology that empowers anyone anywhere to take action on the issues they care about. A closed off Internet means fewer ways for millions of people to make the change they want to see. Without an internet equally accessible to everyone regardless of income or geography, we can’t continue that mission. Add your name to let Congress and the FCC know that you support an open internet.

Change.org
2,257,257 supporters