Change YouTube Copyright Policy to Give Mashup Artists Rights

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Song mashups are a very popular form of content on YouTube, with some videos reaching millions of views. Some mashup artists are even verified by YouTube and have hundreds of thousands of subscribers. With an ever-growing genre of musical content on YouTube that stretches all across the globe in terms of viewership and subscribers, one might think mashup artists are respected by YouTube for bringing so much content and traction to the platform, but unfortunately this isn't the case. 

Mashup artists are very much in the "grey" area when it comes to copyright restrictions, since the majority of their content revolves around using music that they do not own the rights for. With that taken into account, of course they aren't able to collect revenue for themselves (which the majority of mashup creators are fine with), but they do generate revenue for many record labels and artists whose songs they use in their videos. For the most part, mashups may seem like a safe form of content to create, but the problem lies mostly within YouTube's own copyright strike system. If you aren't familiar with the system, the basic idea is that once you receive three copyright strikes from YouTube, your channel gets terminated for good. 

Time after time, mashup creators have been given copyright strikes with many even having their channel terminated completely all because record labels and copyright holders seem to feel the need to punish them for using music they own, even though the mashups are generating revenue and buzz for the label/copyright holders, typically none of which goes to the mashup creator themselves. Often times, it seems that YouTube does not take a very detailed look at why content is being copyright claimed and will occasionally give smaller mashup creators strikes. On top of that, a large majority of the time, those who receive these copyright strikes will receive no further information regarding the strike, meaning they do not know which song was struck for what reason.

For a lot of mashup YouTubers such as myself (MysticWolfMusic), the main reason for creating the content they do is simply because it is a passion and a hobby they enjoy, not because they want to generate revenue for themselves off others' music (which is not possible 99% of the time anyways due to YouTube's auto-detect copyright system). It has been a very risky field of content on YouTube for a long time, and many mashup creators fear losing their channels and content which they've put countless hours and effort into all because of big-name labels, copyright holders and YouTube's lack of care when it comes to looking into these situations. 

Personally, I think a reevaluation of YouTube's copyright strike system regarding music usage is something that needs to happen. Strikes should be given to people promoting hate speech, violence and crime, not small youtube creators using copyrighted music. It's an incredibly unfair system and mashup creators need to be backed up by YouTube, not penalized.