Petition Closed

We all hope to have the freedom to freely express thoughts, to share ideas and ideals. We are outraged, deeply offended when someone tries to silence the voice of those who defend their opinions and ideology. Journalists, are usually the most critical situations of this nature. Milocas Pereira is one of many disappeared journalists under these circumstances. Her unalienable human right should and must be respected, not dismissed and forgotten. We believe it is an enforced disappearance.

"Enforced disappearance" is defined in Article 2 of the Convention as the arrest, detention, abduction or any other form of deprivation of liberty by agents of the state or by persons or groups of persons acting with the authorization, support or acquiescence of the state, followed by a refusal to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person, which place such a person outside the protection of the law.

The widespread or systematic use of enforced disappearance is further defined as a crime against humanity in Article 6.

 

Letter to
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) The Committee for assistance in locating a disappeared person
It's been over two years since the disappearance of journalist Milocas Pereira, a native of Guinea-Bissau, resident of Angola, Luanda, where she was teaching at the University.
She offered some interviews, analyzing some of the crises currently occurring within Guinea-Bissau. Specifically, the Guinean government's role and presence of the Angolan military "Missang" deployed to Guinea-Bissau for military reformation.
It is unknown whether her disappearance is connected with the interviews or not.
It is certain however, she was assaulted by strangers. Afterwards, feeling threatened in Luanda, she considered and confided to a friend that she desired to return back home. Her desire never came to fruition! Not to be seen for a prolonged period of time, the family decided to part with their worries to the authorities about four months after she first disappeared.
Since then, the only response has been silence.
This case has became a mystery, which I was willing to defend and promote. With the hope that the disappearance of this woman will not be buried in silence and oblivion, I have opened a group to help inform the public, and to try to convince the public to come out with any knowledge they may have pertaining to this case. This is a tragedy that should be brought to public attention, and investigated! Her unalienable human right should and must be respected, not dismissed and forgotten.