Petition Closed

Please call or write your state senator:
(202) 224-4242

~~The legislative language of VAWA does not harm families, men or abusers; there are no provisions in VAWA to adjudicate men accused of violence. In many cases the identity of the abuser can be kept confidential if not anonymous. The sole purpose of VAWA is to save lives and protect women. 4 women die each day as a result of domestic violence, every minute a women is raped, 1 in 3 trips to the emergency room are due to domestic violence, DV costs the US $100 Million annually, DV is the leading cause of homelessness in women and runaway teens, young boys between the ages of 15-18 are imprisoned for killing their mother’s abuser, children and animals are often the first and most vulnerable victims of domestic violence, abusers often abuse up to 30 people before the first accusation is made; and these statistics are just the beginning. My heart is with all families torn apart by domestic violence please show them that your heart is too~~

DOJ website: Seventeen years after its original passage, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was introduced for reauthorization last month. The act, the current authorization of which expired in September, was first championed by then Senator Joe Biden, passed by Congress in 1994. This support reflects the very real concern that abuse knows no bounds – victims can be young and old, of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, all genders, from every corner of the country, urban and rural, tribal and territorial.

VAWA has been the cornerstone of the federal government’s efforts to end sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The Act supports programs serving all segments of society, and encourages close collaboration among community service providers and professionals to coordinate efforts to end violence. Since its passage, well over $4 billion has been awarded for victim services and hundreds of programs around the country such as transitional housing, supervised visitation and legal assistance.

The impact of VAWA cannot be overstated: it has profoundly improved lives, has saved lives, and has led to a paradigm shift whereby domestic and sexual violence are no longer private matters, but recognized for the public health, legal and social issues that they are.

While violence has been reduced substantially as a result of VAWA, much remains to be done. The proposed legislation includes a number of important updates and improvements to the law, including a greater emphasis on meeting the needs of survivors of sexual violence addressing, domestic homicides and on reaching traditionally underserved communities.

Please call or write your state senator:
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm
(202) 224-4242

 

Letter to
U.S. Senate
I just signed the following petition addressed to: U.S. Senate, Department Of Justice.

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Reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)

Please call or write your state senator:
(202) 224-4242

~~The legislative language of VAWA does not harm families, men or abusers; there are no provisions in VAWA to adjudicate men accused of violence. In many cases the identity of the abuser can be kept confidential if not anonymous. The sole purpose of VAWA is to save lives and protect women. 4 women die each day as a result of domestic violence, every minute a women is raped, 1 in 3 trips to the emergency room are due to domestic violence, DV costs the US $100 Million annually, DV is the leading cause of homelessness in women and runaway teens, young boys between the ages of 15-18 are imprisoned for killing their mother’s abuser, children and animals are often the first and most vulnerable victims of domestic violence, abusers often abuse up to 30 people before the first accusation is made; and these statistics are just the beginning. My heart is with all families torn apart by domestic violence please show them that your heart is too~~

DOJ website: Seventeen years after its original passage, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was introduced for reauthorization last month. The act, the current authorization of which expired in September, was first championed by then Senator Joe Biden, passed by Congress in 1994. This support reflects the very real concern that abuse knows no bounds – victims can be young and old, of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, all genders, from every corner of the country, urban and rural, tribal and territorial.

VAWA has been the cornerstone of the federal government’s efforts to end sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The Act supports programs serving all segments of society, and encourages close collaboration among community service providers and professionals to coordinate efforts to end violence. Since its passage, well over $4 billion has been awarded for victim services and hundreds of programs around the country such as transitional housing, supervised visitation and legal assistance.

The impact of VAWA cannot be overstated: it has profoundly improved lives, has saved lives, and has led to a paradigm shift whereby domestic and sexual violence are no longer private matters, but recognized for the public health, legal and social issues that they are.

While violence has been reduced substantially as a result of VAWA, much remains to be done. The proposed legislation includes a number of important updates and improvements to the law, including a greater emphasis on meeting the needs of survivors of sexual violence addressing, domestic homicides and on reaching traditionally underserved communities.

Please call or write your state senator:
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm
(202) 224-4242


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Sincerely,