Petition Closed

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), also known as H.R. 3261, is a bill that was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on October 26, 2011, by Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX) and a bipartisan group of 12 initial co-sponsors. The bill expands the ability of U.S. law enforcement and copyright holders to fight online trafficking in copyrighted intellectual property and counterfeit goods.[2] Now before the House Judiciary Committee, it builds on the similar PRO-IP Act of 2008 and the corresponding Senate bill, the PROTECT IP Act. 


The originally proposed bill would allow the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as copyright holders, to seek court orders against websites accused of enabling or facilitating copyright infringement. Depending on who requests the court orders, the actions could include barring online advertising networks and payment facilitators such as PayPal from doing business with the allegedly infringing website, barring search engines from linking to such sites, and requiring Internet service providers to block access to such sites. The bill would make unauthorized streaming of copyrighted content a crime[from the 'US websites'? to US users? clarification needed], with a maximum penalty of five years in prison for 10 pieces of music or movies within six months[for uploaders, downloaders, or hosts? clarification needed]. The bill also gives immunity to Internet services that voluntarily take action against websites dedicated to infringement, while making liable for damages any copyright holder who knowingly misrepresents that a website is dedicated to infringement.

Complete List of Supporting companies:

http://judiciary.house.gov/issues/Rogue%20Websites/List%20of%20SOPA%20Supporters.pdf

This is clear censorship and practically throws out our first amendment rights. Although I feel there needs to be parameters for online content, there is clearly a better way to handle this.

Common vistied websites such as Craigslist, YouTube and Reddit could be shutdown easily. 

Letter to
[Censored] Time Warner Cable and other SOPA supporters
International Union of Police Associations
international trademark association
and 37 others
HarperCollins Publishers Worldwide, Inc.
International AntiCounterfeiting Coalition (IACC)
Hachette Book Group
Chuck Schultz Graphic Artists Guild
Haydn Adams Graphic Artists Guild
Country Music Association
Let Freedom Ring
Darrel Stephens Majority City Chiefs
Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)
Pearson Education
Matt Bennett Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)
Jennifer Wall Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)
National Troopers Coalition
National Narcotics Officers’ Associations’ Coalition
Time Warner
National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)
Country Music Association
Council of State Governments
Sarah Grano American Bankers Association (ABA)
John Hall American Bankers Association (ABA)
McGraw-Hill Education
Marvel Entertainment LLC
MasterCard WorldWide
Tiffany & Co.
Scholastic Inc.
Ray Kerins Pfizer
60 Plus Association
Andi Sporkin Association of American Publishers
Center for Individual Freedom
Copyright Alliance
Cengage Learning
Kenneth Edwards Building and Construction Trades Department
Michael Cunningham Building and Construction Trades Department
BMG Chrysalis US
Bob McConnell Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies
Judith Platt Association of American Publishers
Karl Uhlendorf Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Time Warner Cable and other SOPA supporters...

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Stop the support of SOPA

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), also known as H.R. 3261, is a bill that was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on October 26, 2011, by Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX) and a bipartisan group of 12 initial co-sponsors. The bill expands the ability of U.S. law enforcement and copyright holders to fight online trafficking in copyrighted intellectual property and counterfeit goods.[2] Now before the House Judiciary Committee, it builds on the similar PRO-IP Act of 2008 and the corresponding Senate bill, the PROTECT IP Act.[3]
The originally proposed bill would allow the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as copyright holders, to seek court orders against websites accused of enabling or facilitating copyright infringement. Depending on who requests the court orders, the actions could include barring online advertising networks and payment facilitators such as PayPal from doing business with the allegedly infringing website, barring search engines from linking to such sites, and requiring Internet service providers to block access to such sites. The bill would make unauthorized streaming of copyrighted content a crime[from the 'US websites'? to US users? clarification needed], with a maximum penalty of five years in prison for 10 pieces of music or movies within six months[for uploaders, downloaders, or hosts? clarification needed]. The bill also gives immunity to Internet services that voluntarily take action against websites dedicated to infringement, while making liable for damages any copyright holder who knowingly misrepresents that a website is dedicated to infringement.

Complete List of Supporting companies:

http://judiciary.house.gov/issues/Rogue%20Websites/List%20of%20SOPA%20Supporters.pdf

This is ultimately clear censorship and practically throws out our first amendment rights. Although perimeters should be in place, this clearly is not the way to do it.
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Sincerely,