Petition Closed
Petitioning The Royal College of GPs

Improve dyspraxia training for GPs and create a diagnostic pathway

Dyspraxia is a developmental disorder affecting coordination, visual-spatial abilities, sequencing and short-term memory, with a significant impact on work and daily life. It is part of a group of conditions known as Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs), which includes dyslexia, Aspergers Syndrome and Attention Deficit Disorder. Studies suggest that mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are significantly more common in people with SpLDs than the general population (Alexander-Passe, 2006, Whitehouse et all, 2008). They also indicate that a high proportion of mental health service users with anxiety and depression have an underlying SpLD that is unrecognised. According to The Dyspraxia Foundation, an unrecognised dyspraxic child is five times more likely than average to develop psychological problems by the age of 16. It is important that mental health professionals are trained to identify, refer and support those with SpLDs, particularly dyspraxia, which is less well-known compared to dyslexia, and often diagnosed later. We would also like to see a diagnostic pathway for GPs to refer individuals for diagnosis.

Letter to
The Royal College of GPs
I just signed the following petition addressed to: The Royal College of GPs.

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Improve dyspraxia training for GPs and create a diagnostic pathway

Dyspraxia is a developmental disorder affecting coordination, visual-spatial abilities, sequencing and short-term memory, with a significant impact on work and daily life. It is part of a group of conditions known as Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs), which includes dyslexia, Aspergers Syndrome and Attention Deficit Disorder. Studies suggest that mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are significantly more common in people with SpLDs than the general population (Alexander-Passe, 2006, Whitehouse et all, 2008). They also indicate that a high proportion of mental health service users with anxiety and depression have an underlying SpLD that is unrecognised. According to The Dyspraxia Foundation, an unrecognised dyspraxic child is five times more likely than average to develop psychological problems by the age of 16. It is important that mental health professionals are trained to identify, refer and support those with SpLDs, particularly dyspraxia, which is less well-known compared to dyslexia, and often diagnosed later. We would also like to see a diagnostic pathway for GPs to refer individuals for diagnosis.
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Sincerely,