Petition Closed
Petitioning The parents of Adalia Rose

Stop the shameless exploitation of your daughter


46
Supporters

Genetic disorders have been part of human history since the early beginnings of our species. Some are rare, some are serious, and some are incurable. And sometimes, unfortunately, the people with them can be exposed to a society that will mock them for having it. It's upsetting because the person's condition is usually the above three qualities: rare, serious, and incurable. Even more upsetting is the fact that the mocking may not have started if they were kept away from the public eye.

This is exactly the case with Adalia Rose, a 5-year-old girl with progeria, a rare genetic disorder that causes one's appearance to be of great age. About 1 in 8 million births bear children with a form of this condition (source: wikipedia). However, when people think of the term 'progeria', usually only one name comes to mind: Adalia Rose. Why? Her Facebook. Her Twitter. Her many many many pictures on Google and various other sites. Her dancing videos on YouTube. And she's only 5. Why does any 5 year old need all of that? Who runs that stuff anyway? Her parents.

Parents need to be proud of their children. A simple picture here and there for family and friends to see, or a first video of your child on the swingset at the park is cute. But when you repeatedly dress up your child for photoshoots, or pick a song and film her dancing to it, you have to stand back and think: why? At that point, you're asking for attention, not only for the innocent child, but also for yourself. Face it, you're practically exploiting your daughter's condition to draw attention to yourselves. You're asking for attention, and you're getting it. And then you complain about the negative attention you're receiving? It's your own fault, and you have only yourself to blame for the attention you're getting.

If you had any decency in you, you'd stop: you'd delete the pages, delete the videos, and go back to a quiet life, and even that wouldn't be enough to undo the damage you'd done. How are you going to explain to her once she gets into her teenage years and discovers the Internet for herself? What are you going to do when she finds the countless number of memes and images and cruel jokes about her that only exist because you made her public? Things like that don't go away. How will you live with yourself? If it were me, I'd hate my parents for doing that. I'd have wanted to be left alone: I wouldn't want my face plastered on countless websites, or have videos of me dancing in ridiculous outfits. I'd have wanted to enjoy what I can in life, well away from the cruelty of the Internet.

Try to imagine your reaction if it was you with a disfiguring condition, plastered on every social media site and ridiculed and mocked. Think about how much you would like that. If you had any heart, you know you would never want your child, or any child for that matter, to be subjected to that kind of abuse.

Letter to
The parents of Adalia Rose
I just signed the following petition addressed to: The parents of Adalia Rose.

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Stop the shameless exploitation of your daughter

Genetic disorders have been part of human history since the early beginnings of our species. Some are rare, some are serious, and some are incurable. And sometimes, unfortunately, the people with them can be exposed to a society that will mock them for having it. It's upsetting because the person's condition is usually the above three qualities: rare, serious, and incurable. Even more upsetting is the fact that the mocking may not have started if they were kept away from the public eye.

This is exactly the case with Adalia Rose, a 5-year-old girl with progeria, a rare genetic disorder that causes one's appearance to be of great age. About 1 in 8 million births bear children with a form of this condition (source: wikipedia). However, when people think of the term 'progeria', usually only one name comes to mind: Adalia Rose. Why? Her Facebook. Her Twitter. Her many many many pictures on Google and various other sites. Her dancing videos on YouTube. And she's only 5. Why does any 5 year old need all of that? Who runs that stuff anyway? Her parents.

Parents need to be proud of their children. A simple picture here and there for family and friends to see, or a first video of your child on the swingset at the park is cute. But when you repeatedly dress up your child for photoshoots, or pick a song and film her dancing to it, you have to stand back and think: why? At that point, you're asking for attention, not only for the innocent child, but also for yourself. Face it, you're practically exploiting your daughter's condition to draw attention to yourselves. You're asking for attention, and you're getting it. And then you complain about the negative attention you're receiving? It's your own fault, and you have only yourself to blame for the attention you're getting.

If you had any decency in you, you'd stop: you'd delete the pages, delete the videos, and go back to a quiet life, and even that wouldn't be enough to undo the damage you'd done. How are you going to explain to her once she gets into her teenage years and discovers the Internet for herself? What are you going to do when she finds the countless number of memes and images and cruel jokes about her that only exist because you made her public? Things like that don't go away. How will you live with yourself? If it were me, I'd hate my parents for doing that. I'd have wanted to be left alone: I wouldn't want my face plastered on countless websites, or have videos of me dancing in ridiculous outfits. I'd have wanted to enjoy what I can in life, well away from the cruelty of the Internet.

Try to imagine your reaction if it was you with a disfiguring condition, plastered on every social media site and ridiculed and mocked. Think about how much you would like that. If you had any heart, you know you would never want your child, or any child for that matter, to be subjected to that kind of abuse.
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Sincerely,