Tell MLB Commissioner "No pace-of-play rules"

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MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred wants to implement pace-of-play rules in the game of baseball. These include clocks on the pitcher, limiting the amount of time he has between each pitch; limiting mound visits by the manager, coaches, or other players; and a clock on the time between batters. Commissioner Manfred believes that games are too long for the fans, but has he asked the fans for their opinion?

Baseball is and always has been different from the other major sports. One of the huge differences is the lack of a clock. Imposing time restraints takes away a key component of the game. It also will make it more difficult for coaches and players to do their jobs if these rules are implemented.

According to baseball-reference.com, the first year that the average game time was over 3 hours was 2000. It was not until 2012 that the average again broke 3 hours. In 2015, the year Manfred became Commissioner, the average was 3 hours and it has gone up each year since (3 hours, 4 minutes avg & 3 hrs 8 mins avg), despite some measures already implemented to cut down on game time.

What will happen if a pitcher can't hold a runner on base because he has a clock on him? How will close games be affected? Teams with young pitchers will especially be affected, because they often need more visits from their coaches and teammates to calm them down and talk through things

Former Commissioner, Bowie Kuhn, said, "I believe in the Rip van Winkle theory - that a man from 1910 must be able to wake up after being asleep for 70 years, walk into a ballpark, and understand the game perfectly."

Please support the integrity and timelessness of the game of baseball. Let the Commissioner know that we like this game just the way it is and we the fans don't want pace of play rules.



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