Petition Closed
Petitioning New York State Department of Education Commissioner of Education John King and 1 other

The New York State Department of Education: Make the 2013 NYS Common Core Exams Available for Public Viewing

1,323
Supporters

The secrecy and lack of access surrounding this year’s Common Core Math and ELA exams is unprecedented, and eliminates the system of checks and balances that characterizes a public education in a democratic and equitable society. Due to the high stakes attached to these assessments and in light of Pearson’s recent test construction errors, lack of public oversight is unacceptable. As taxpayers, teachers and parents, we must demand transparency in the testing process used to evaluate our students, teachers and schools. Send the message that NYS values democracy, children, education and accountability over corporate interests. Allow public access to the 2013 NYS Common Core exams.

Unless they are made public, these exams serve no pedagogical purpose other than to grade teachers and schools.  The state has asserted that these tests indicate where our children stand on the road to career and college readiness. While we maintain varying view points on current education reform, we can all agree that the data collected is inconsequential if the scores are not available until after a student has advanced to the next grade, and engaged in a different curriculum.

Rather than engaging in sound pedagogical practice, and allowing teachers, parents, and students to access the tests for review and post-test analysis, and rather than allowing educators to use these exams to glean information that informs instruction and allows them to target areas of weakness, the state has empowered corporate interests to dictate policy, and sadly, they have put our children’s interests last. The state has asked teachers to sign confidentiality agreements that prohibit them from discussing the exams with parents, even in vague terms. This undermines the trust and collaborative partnership between educators and parents, and fosters an educational environment of fear, mistrust, and intimidation.

 

Letter to
New York State Department of Education Commissioner of Education John King
NYS Board of Regents, Chancellor Meryll Tisch
I am a concerned citizen, and parent writing to you on behalf of the thousands of students who were recently forced to submit to the NYS ELA and Math exams. My hard-earned tax dollars helped fund the creation of these tests. The children and students of my community sat for hours of testing, enduring anxiety and stress in the days leading up to the exams. They expended mental energy answering field test questions that are of no value to them, but which represent significant financial gain to those who make the tests. I am one of your stakeholders, and I have a vested interest in these exams being made available for objective and un-biased public scrutiny. Furthermore, I object to my tax dollars being used to fund educational mandates that do not benefit students. Therefore, I demand that these tests be made public once they are scored.
Unless they are made public, these exams serve no pedagogical purpose other than to grade teachers and schools. The state has asserted that these tests indicate where our children stand on the road to career and college readiness. While we maintain varying view points on current education reform, we can all agree that the data collected is inconsequential if the scores are not available until after a student has advanced to the next grade, and engaged in a different curriculum.
Rather than engaging in sound pedagogical practice, and allowing teachers, parents, and students to access the tests for review and post-test analysis, and rather than allowing educators to use these exams to glean information that informs instruction and allows them to target areas of weakness, the state has empowered corporate interests to dictate policy, and sadly, they have put our children’s interests last. The state has asked teachers to sign confidentiality agreements that prohibit them from discussing the exams with parents, even in vague terms. This undermines the trust and collaborative partnership between educators and parents, and fosters an educational environment of fear, mistrust, and intimidation.
The secrecy and lack of access surrounding this year’s exams is unprecedented, and eliminates the system of checks and balances that characterizes a public education in a democratic and equitable society. Due to the high stakes attached to these assessments and in light of Pearson’s recent test construction errors, lack of public oversight is unacceptable. As a taxpayer, I demand transparency in the testing process used to evaluate our students, teachers and schools. Send the message that NYS values democracy, children, education and accountability over corporate interests by allowing public access to the 2013 NYS Common Core exams.