Petition Closed

The idea of a taxpayer receipt has been around for years, but the IRS still doesn't provide one. Experts say it wouldn't be difficult or costly to produce, so what's the hold-up?

Depending on who you listen to, you might think the largest chunk of your tax dollars goes to military spending, foreign aid or welfare payments. It's none of those. The largest portion goes to Social Security, followed by Medicare and Medicaid. Then comes interest on the national debt, combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and military pay and benefits.

Things get more interesting the less money is involved. Some programs that are vital to this country's future don't cost much, relative to the big-ticket items, so why are they always under attack? The median taxpayer contributes less than $100 a year for K-12 education, Pell Grants for low-income college students, Head Start programs and public housing.

When we see what costs too much, and what costs too little, we can be better informed voters and citizens. Tell the IRS to start providing itemized receipts to taxpayers!

Photo credit: SFG

Letter to
National Taxpayer Advocate Nina E. Olson
Chief, IRS Communications Frank Keith
The idea of a taxpayer receipt has been around for years, but the IRS still doesn't provide one. Experts say it wouldn't be difficult or costly to produce, so what's the hold-up?

Depending on who they listen to, Americans might think the largest chunk of their tax dollars goes to military spending, foreign aid or welfare payments. It's none of those. The largest portion goes to Social Security, followed by Medicare and Medicaid. Then comes interest on the national debt, combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and military pay and benefits.

Things get more interesting the less money is involved. Some programs that are vital to this country's future don't cost much, relative to the big-ticket items. The median taxpayer contributes less than $100 a year for K-12 education, Pell Grants for low-income college students, Head Start programs and public housing.

When we see what costs too much, and what costs too little, we can be better informed voters and citizens. Please start providing itemized receipts to taxpayers.