Petition Closed

After months of denial, this week, Japanese officials admitted that Fisheries Agency officers have been accepting gifts of whale meat in excess of $3000.  This comes as no surprise to those who are aware of Japan's corrupt whaling industry, but to the wider world, it serves as a public embarrasment and loss of credibility for Japan.  And this presents great opportunity.

For years, Japan has been pushing to lift the global ban on whaling—often using dirty tactics—and has been exploiting a loophole in the policy that allows for whaling for "scientific research."  This summer, after frustrating negotiations at the International Whaling Commission meeting, Australia filed a lawsuit with the International Court of Justice in The Hague against Japanese whaling activities.  This court, however, is painfully slow, and right now, Japanese whalers are heading south, with plans to hunt whales around Antarctica in an area twice the size as those in the past.

The recent evidence of Japan's clear intentions to hunt whales for profit demands immediate response by the international community. And the best response is for the International Court of Justice to issue an immediate injunction.

Join Australian Opposition party members in calling for an immediate injunction on Japanese whaling activities.  Sign here to send a letter to the U.S. State Department and International Whaling Commission representative Monica Medina telling them that America must be a leader in responding to this abuse of the global whaling moratorium.


Letter to
Undersecretary of State, Democracy Global Affairs Maria Otero
U.S. Representative to the International Whaling Commission Monica Medina
For decades The U.S. has done little to stop Japan from exploiting a loophole in the global ban on whaling, watching as they hunted hundreds of whales under the false pretense of "scientific research"—for which no data has ever been published. Now, after months of denial, Japanese officials have admitted that Fisheries Agency officers have been accepting gifts of whale meat in excess of $3000.

This news proves the deep level of corruption within Japanese whaling industry and we believe it calls for immediate action by the international community. Australia has already filed a lawsuit in the International Court of Justice at The Hague, but the process is moving along too slowly. Right now, Japanese whalers are heading south to the Antarctic for another whaling season—this year covering twice the area as in the past.

I ask you to use your powers of office to push the U.S. to become a leader in the effort to protect whales by calling upon the ICJ to issue an immediate injunction against Japanese whaling until further investigations into their corrupt industry can be conducted.

I look forward to following news of the U.S. taking such a leadership role in addressing this issue of blatant abuse in international law.