Petition Closed
Petitioning Environmental Protection Agency

Tell the EPA to Protect Imperiled Wildlife from Poisons!

Black-tailed prairie dogs are currently being considered for protection under the Endangered Species Act. So why would the EPA even think about approving two new poisons to help kill prairie dogs in ten states across America?

Rozol and Kaput-D are blood-thinning poisons that, when ingested, cause prairie dogs to slowly bleed to death a cruel and excruciating way to die. These poisons also set off a chain reaction of secondary poisoning that can kill imperiled animals that are tied to prairie dogs on the food chain -- including black-footed ferrets, swift foxes, badgers, bald eagles, burrowing owls and ferruginous hawks.

We need your help to spare prairie dogs and other wildlife from a cruel and painful death -- and hold the EPA accountable for its role in speeding the decline of imperiled species.

Please fill out the form below to urge the EPA to ban the use of these poisons on prairie dogs for their sake and for the black-footed ferrets and other imperiled Great Plains wildlife that depend on them to survive. The deadline for comments is October 23rd, so we don’t have much time.

Letter to
Environmental Protection Agency
As someone who cares about wildlife and environmental health, I'm writing to strongly oppose the Environmental Protection Agency's efforts to register Kaput-D for use in eradicating prairie dogs in ten states across the Great Plains. The Environmental Protection Agency should not approve Kaput-D, and should immediately rescind its May 2009 approval of Rozol, a similar poison used to kill prairie dogs.

In addition to killing black-tailed prairie dogs -- themselves a candidate for federal protection -- these poisons will put other imperiled species at unacceptable risk in violation of the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Act and other federal laws.

Prairie dogs have declined by more than 95% from their historic numbers due to habitat loss, poisoning, shooting and non-native disease. And as a keystone species, their decline has had a negative effect on other prairie animals -- including black-footed ferrets, one of the rarest animals in the world.

So it begs the question: why would the EPA even consider approving two new poisons that will help speed the decline of these already imperiled species?

Rozol and Kaput-D cause prairie dogs to slowly bleed to death -- a cruel and excruciating way to die. These chemicals also set off a chain reaction of secondary poisoning that can kill imperiled animals that are tied to prairie dogs on the food chain -- including black-footed ferrets, swift foxes, badgers, golden and bald eagles, burrowing owls and ferruginous hawks.

In September, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials requested that your agency consult with them before approving Rozol -- and to put Kaput-D on hold completely -- because prairie dog poisoning had been shown to be a "major factor in the decline of [black-footed] ferrets" and because they had serious concerns about the effects these two poisons could have on other prairie wildlife.

But despite these requests, the EPA went ahead and approved the use of Rozol without properly consulting with federal wildlife experts and without giving the public a chance to weigh in on this deadly decision. And now the agency is poised to approve Kaput-D.

The Environmental Protection Agency is supposed to protect our environment and the wildlife we share it with. I hope you will rethink your decision to play an active role in speeding the decline of several already imperiled species and rescind your decision to approve these deadly poisons.

Thank you for considering my views on this urgent matter. I look forward to your reply.