Petition Closed

Honey bees are in dire straits. Since 2006, some beekeepers have reported losing 30 to 90 percent of their hives to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a phenomenon where bees leave their hives and never return. While experts think many factors are contributing to CCD, pesticides are one of the culprits that have been fingered.

Beekeepers and a group of non-profits recently called on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to remove Poncho, a commonly used pesticide, from store shelves and restrict its use. The group claims that the pesticide may be killing off bees, serving as a major contributor to CCD. They also say that Poncho really shouldn't have ever made it into the marketplace at all. Bayer Crop Science, the maker of Poncho, failed to conduct research that adequately studied Poncho's potential impact on honey bees. 

Through pollination, honey bees are responsible for producing one-third of America's food supply. If pesticides like Poncho keep perpetuating the spread of CCD, we can kiss food security goodbye.

It's time to stop CCD. Sign our petition asking the EPA to immediately ban the sale of Poncho and conduct a thorough study that analyzes the pesticide's potential impacts on honey bees.

Letter to
Director, EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs Steven Bradbury
It's come to our attention that Poncho, also known as clothianidin, may be harming honey bees and contributing to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Until this product is proven safe for bees, it should not be used.

The EPA may have given Bayer CropScience "conditional registration" for Poncho, but the company was supposed to conduct a thorough environmental review of this product. In reality, Bayer relied on flawed science and insufficient data to show that Poncho poses no threat to honey bees.

Honey bees are responsible for producing one-third of America's food supply. Yet because of CCD, beekeepers have reported losing 30 to 90 percent of their hives. It's time to protect America's food security by combating this deadly disease.

Unless a pesticide is proven to be safe for honey bees, it's got no business being in the marketplace. Please immediately stop the sale of Poncho and require that a thorough environmental study be conducted that analyzes the pesticide's potential impacts on wildlife.