Petition Closed

You'd think a Florida-based company would care about men and women being enslaved in their own backyard, right? In Publix Supermarket's case, that's so wrong. Publix, one of the largest supermarket chains in Florida, has not only refused to address the slavery and exploitation of farm workers in their own backyard, they've practically laughed at it. According to Publix’s Media and Community Relations Manager Dwaine Stevens,

“We don’t have any plans to sit down with the CIW because it's not our issue... If there are some atrocities going on, it’s not our business. Maybe it’s something the government should get involved with.”

None of your business, Publix? Actually, when you sell tomatoes picked by enslaved or exploited farm workers, slavery is a huge part of your business -- it's in your business model, your business profits, and in the loss of business that happens when customers choose to shop at a supermarket that cares about workers.

Publix should follow the lead of many other leading companies in Florida and sign the Coalition of Immokalee Workers' Campaign for Fair Food, which raises farmworker wages by a penny per pound of tomatoes and creates protections against slavery and exploitation. It's time Publix supported the workers of Florida and started selling slave-free tomatoes.

Letter to
Media & Community Relations Manager Dwaine Stevens
Director of Media & Community Relations for Publix Maria Brous
Charities Hoyt Barnett
and 3 others
Chair, Board of Directors Howard Jenkins
CEO Publix Supermarkets Ed Crenshaw
CFO David Phillips
As a Publix customer, I was disturbed to recently hear the comments of Media and Community Relations Manager Dwaine Stevens,

“We don’t have any plans to sit down with the CIW because it's not our issue... If there are some atrocities going on, it’s not our business. Maybe it’s something the government should get involved with.”

As a business in Florida, Publix should care about the enslavement and exploitation of farmworkers who grow and harvest the food you sell. In the past decade, more than 1000 workers have been enslaved in the tomato industry in Florida, and thousands more have been abused and exploited. When Publix profits from the sale of tomatoes picked by these workers, their abuse is your business.

As a customer, I care deeply about the fair treatment of the workers who pick my food, and will shop at supermarket chains that respect those workers' freedom and dignity. Please sign the Coalition of Immokalee Workers' Campaign for Fair Food. If you don't stand up for workers' rights, I'll take my business to a company that will.

Regards,