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For more than two years, workers have been calling on Hyatt to provide safer working conditions for housekeeping staff. Housekeepers at some Hyatts clean as many as 30 rooms a day, nearly double what is typically required at union hotels.   In a study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine examining a total of 50 hotel properties from 5 different hotel companies, Hyatt housekeepers had the highest injury rate of all housekeepers studied by hotel company. 

Housekeepers do work that can lead to debilitating injuries, and now Hyatt has stepped up its abuse of housekeepers this month. 

On Thursday, July 21, 2011, under stifling heat, workers at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Chicago were walking the picket line, calling on the hotel to approve a fair contract for workers.

What happened next is hard to believe.  Hyatt turned heat lamps on its workers. In the summer. During that week's record-breaking heat dome.

Reports one local radio station, "Combined with the outdoor air temperature, Linda Long says it was hotter than the Hyatt kitchen she’s worked in for eleven years."

“They put the heat lamps on us, like we were nothing,” Long said. “If the heat didn’t kill us, the heat lamps would.”

This kind of blatant disregard for their workers is outrageous, but for those familiar with Hyatt's management tactics, it's not surprising. In Boston, Hyatt fired nearly 100 housekeepers in one day and replaced them with temporary workers earning minimum wage. And at the Park Hyatt in Chicago where the "heat lamp" incident occurred, workers say the hotel has refused to address concerns over dangerous workloads and subcontracting for Hyatt housekeepers.

The people who clean, staff and help make Hyatt Hotels successful are simply seeking protections on the job. It's time we turned up the heat on Hyatt and call on the hotel management to stop abusing housekeepers.

 

Letter to
Hyatt President & CEO Mark Hoplamazian
As a traveler and someone familiar with Hyatt hotels, I was shocked to learn of an incident in which Hyatt endangered the lives of picketing workers by switching on heat lamps in the hot July sun.

Workers should be allowed to demonstrate for better wages and working conditions, without fear of having their employer punish them with brutal tactics. Media reports suggest that a 'rogue' Hyatt manager switched on 10 heat lamps strung up on an awning above picketing workers.

Unfortunately, this latest incident is part of a pattern of abusive practices by Hyatt toward housekeeping staff.

For more than two years, workers have been calling on Hyatt to stand up for safer working conditions. Housekeepers at some Hyatts clean as many as 30 rooms a day, nearly double what is typically required at union hotels. In a study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine examining a total of 50 hotel properties from 5 different hotel companies, Hyatt housekeepers had the highest injury rate of all housekeepers studied by hotel company. You routinely place dangerous workloads on employees, and refuse to address these concerns.

No one should fear for their employer physically endangering them - whether on the job or on the picket line. It's time for Hyatt to negotiate with housekeepers for a safer, more respectful workplace.