Confirmed victory
Petitioning U.S. House of Representatives

Support SB 285 - Private Immigration Bill for Sopuruchi Victor Chukwueke


2,950
Supporters

Victor Chukwueke was born in Nigeria on February 10, 1986. During his early childhood, he developed a benign tumor caused by Neurofibromatosis, which grew on his frontal and right facial area, subsequently resulting in a very significant facial deformity. Growing up in Nigeria where he could not get medical treatment for his condition, Victor was the subject of much ridicule from his peers and faced a life-time of hardship as a result of his medical condition.

When he was merely 15, Victor was brought to the United States for medical treatment. Since then, he has had seven major surgeries. Unfortunately, Victor fell out of immigration status while he was 16 and undergoing a painful surgery. He did not have the help he needed at the time to navigate the complexity of the immigration system.

Despite huge obstacles and a life-threatening medical condition which rendered him blind in one eye, Victor Chukwueke graduated from Wayne State University and received admission into medical school, only to be told that he could not attend because he did not have a green card. Refusing to give up, Victor sought the help of Senator Carl Levin's office, which introduced a private immigration relief bill for him.

His private immigration bill got through the Judiciary Committee, sailed through the Senate with bipartisan support and now needs your help in passing through the House.

Letter to
U.S. House of Representatives
I am writing to urge you to support a private immigration relief bill for Sopuruchi “Victor” Chukwueke. Senator Carl Levin introduced SB 285, a private bill for Victor, which passed the Senate on July 25, 2012, and requires your help and leadership to get through the House now.

Victor was born in Nigeria on February 10, 1986. During his early childhood, he developed a benign tumor caused by Neurofibromatosis, which grew on his frontal and right facial area, subsequently resulting in a very significant facial deformity. Growing up in Nigeria where he could not get medical treatment for his condition, Victor was the subject of much ridicule from his peers and faced a life-time of hardship as a result of his medical condition.

Fortunately, Rev. Mother Paul Offiah who ran a handicap (orphanage) center for orphans, abandoned and neglected disabled children in Nigeria, took Victor under her wing and found a physician in the United States who was willing to conduct Victor’s surgery. Victor arrived in the United States in August 21, 2001, when he was 15 years old on a B-2 visa. He was left in the care of Sister Immaculata Osueke and other nuns in Lansing, Michigan.

Unfortunately, Victor’s application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status was rejected twice because he could not afford the application fee and he fell out of status. This happened while Victor was preparing for a painful surgery and he was merely 16 years old at the time, with little to no resources to help him navigate the complicated immigration system.

Since his arrival in Michigan in 2001, Victor has been in and out of hospital, and has had seven major surgeries between to remove the Neurofibromatosis and reconstruct his face. If sent back to Nigeria, Victor faces imminent death as a result of his medical condition.

Despite the many obstacles in his path, Victor has worked hard in school and graduated from Wayne State University with a B.S. He was the commencement speaker at his graduation and since then, he has gained acceptance into the University of Toledo, College of Medicine, conditioned on receiving lawful permanent residence in the United States before the start of classes this August. Victor wants to be a surgeon so that he can give back to the country that saved his life.

Please show compassion for Victor and vote in support of his private immigration relief bill, SB 285, so that Victor can become a lawful permanent resident of the United States and go on to become a surgeon to give back to our country.

Sincerely,