Subway - Stop Using King's Hawaiian Bread That Contains Azodicarbonamide

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Hi there, this is Stephanie from The Food for Thought. I recently discovered that Subway is now using a bread that contains extremely harmful additives that are not used – and in some cases banned – in other countries. That bread is an iconic American brand: Hawaiian Kings Bread.

Hawaiian Kings Bread US contains ingredients we typically wouldn’t find in bread: calcium silicate (which is typically used as an insulation material), calcium stearate (the main component of soap scum), and monocalcium phosphate (commonly used in fertilizers). They all are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the FDA, but it’s still unsettling that the same additives we’re eating are being used in these non-food applications. These types of products go against Subway’s “Fresh Now” pledge. As part of this pledge, the fresh vegetable display case was installed in certain locations behind the sandwich line. “Five decades of slicing vegetables in-house didn’t resonate until customers could see it.”

This is not the first time Subway is using bread with toxic additives. The Food Babe called upon Subway to stop using dangerous chemicals in its bread in 2013.  

It’s time we demand Subway uphold its pledge “We care about food. Where it comes from and how it nourishes us is just as important as how it tastes."

That's why I'm petitioning Subway to stop serving King’s Hawaiian Bread that includes dangerous and unhealthy additives.

Here are the reasons I'm asking Subway to stop using King’s Hawaiian Bread for its sandwiches.

Contains Azodicarbonamide:

> The exact same ingredient the Food Babe petitioned Subway to stop using because it’s the same chemical used to make yoga mats and shoe rubber


Contains trans-fats:

> Which Subway states clearly they provide nutritionally balanced sandwiches Free of artificial trans fat-free (no partially-hydrogenated oil).
> Unfortunately, there is an FDA loophole when it comes to trans-fats. If the amount of trans-fat in a product is less than half a gram per serving, manufacturers can round it down to 0.
> But even 0.49 grams of trans-fat is bad for you.

Contains Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides:

> This is a dough conditioner used to improve volume and uniformity in breads.

DATEM is considered safe by the FDA, but a study on rats showed “heart muscle fibrosis and adrenal overgrowth.”

Contains glycerides:

> Mono and diglycerides are commonly used in processed foods to maintain stability in liquid products and "improve" quality in baked goods.

> These glycerides could be created using both hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils or animal fats. In theory, this may transfer a small amount of trans fats into the product. The glycerides are synthesized into phosphates by reacting with phosphorus pentoxide, a potential environmental hazard. But that's only part of the problem . . .

> The presence of mono and diglycerides should discourage you from buying a product for more than just these reasons: their inclusion in a product indicates that it is industrially processed.

Contains calcium stearate (the main component of soap scum):

> Require a warning label in other countries outside the US.

> Have been banned in countries like Norway and Austria (and are being phased out in the UK).

> Cause an increase in hyperactivity in children.

> Have a negative impact on children’s ability to learn.

> Have been linked to long-term health problems such as asthma, skin rashes, and migraines.

> Add absolutely no nutritional value to the foods we are eating and are solely used for aesthetic purposes only.

 

Everyone deserves to know the truth.

Subway was endorsed by the former First Lady of the United States saying every single item on the kid’s menu met the “highest nutrition standards.” If Subway upholds their nutritional and safety pledge to customers, this could inspire other chains across the US to finally eliminate products that included dangerous and unhealthy ingredients once and for all.

Join me now and sign this petition.  Together we can make a difference.

King’s Hawaiin Bread Honey Wheat Dinner Rolls
Ingredients
Per roll (28 g): 100 calories, 2 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 90 mg sodium, 17 g carbs (1 g fibre, 6 g sugar), 3 g protein

King’s Hawaiian Hamburger Buns

Per 1 bun (46 g): 150 calories, 3.5 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 135 mg sodium, 25 g carbs (1 g fibre, 9 g sugar), 4 g protein

Who should get the award for worst bread? The King’s Hawaiian bakers or their food scientists? These buns are a conglomerate of nearly 50 chemicals, additives, and preservatives. Sugar, liquid sugar, honey, and invert syrup all contribute to a high sugar content, and there are weight-loss-stifling ingredients like mono- and diglycerides, along with ingredients we typically wouldn’t find in bread: calcium silicate (which is typically used as an insulation material), calcium stearate (the main component of soap scum), and monocalcium phosphate (commonly used in fertilizers). They all are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the FDA, but it’s still unsettling that the same additives we’re eating are being used in these non-food applications.

 

News & Sources
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/bread-rising-kings-hawaiian-freshly-123000441.html
https://www.qsrmagazine.com/news/subway-introduces-king-s-hawaiian-bread-300-locations
https://www.fooducate.com/product/King%20s%20Hawaiian%20Hawaiian%20Sweet%20Bread/221598A8-E110-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471
https://www.subway.com/en-US/AboutUs/SocialResponsibility/NutritionalLeadership#breadth
https://foodbabe.com/launching-petition-subway-will-finally-hear-us-loud-clear/