SAVE ST. TAMMANY PARISH ANIMAL CONTROL

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****This is URGENT. Please read this in its entirety. ****** SAVE ST. TAMMANY PARISH ANIMAL CONTROL!!

If we are going to really help the animals in this parish everyone needs to understand what is about to happen and what it means for the animals.

We have been working very hard over the last couple months to work with St. Tammany Department of Animal services on hwy 36 to one day becoming an open intake shelter where animals are never euthanatized for convenience or space and only for EXTREME medical need or aggression.

Together with this community and help of many rescues we have made a big difference in a very short time.

In November of this year when this milege should go up for renewal, there is talks going on about not even putting it up for the public to vote on whether or not the shelter should continue to be funded or closed. This should be our choice! Not the Parish! Its our right to vote!

RIGHT NOW the Parish doesn’t want to be bothered by the animal problems and is looking into turning it over to an organization that is considered No-kill.

I know we all hear that word and you may feel a sigh of relief knowing the animals will be safe. THIS IS NOT TRUE!

Unfortunately this is the worst case scenario for the animals in our parish. Let me explain why.

Maybe you have known someone or even you have gone to a no kill shelter or rescue facility and thinking they will help with the dog you found or whose owners died and has now been abandoned just to be told they cannot take it because they are full or the animal is to old or not highly adoptable.


These rescues or no kill facilities are a limited or (selective) intake organizations.

A Closer Look at ‘No-Kill’ limited intake Animal Shelters

 

‘Sorry—We’re Full’

Keeping animals out of shelters may keep “no-kill” shelters’ euthanasia rates low and make for effective fundraising, but it spells disaster for animals. See why “no-kill” can mean no help for the neediest cats and dogs:

St Tammany Animal Services is flooded with thousands of animals every year because “no-kill” facilities are perpetually full, with weeks- or months-long waiting lists, “managed admissions,” and appointment-based systems. Under intense pressure from “no-kill” extremists to reduce euthanasia at all costs, many shelters are turning their backs on the very animals that need them. They cannot take dogs with behavior issues, injuries, or health issues because it may jeopardize their "no kill status"

The limited intake philosophy is not the solution for the problem because you’re not addressing all the animals in need. Only a small portion.

What happened to those animals turned away in areas that only have limited intake last year?”

HERE ARE THE REAL CONSEQUENCES

After a shelter in West Virginia refused to take two kittens from him, a man tossed the animals from his car window and intentionally ran over them in the shelter’s parking lot. One kitten was killed instantly, and the other had to be euthanized.

When an animal hoarder in New York asked a “no-kill” shelter to take some of her cats, she was put on a waiting list. About a year and a half later, authorities raided the hoarder’s home and found 67 dead cats and kittens in a freezer, along with 72 live cats who were suffering from flea infestations, untreated wounds, dehydration, and upper respiratory illnesses.

Right before dawn one morning, a man drove up to a “no-kill” animal shelter in Virginia. He didn’t know anyone was watching, but he apparently did know that the limited-admission shelter often refused entry to animals in need. The man was seen throwing a mixed-breed dog—frightened and malnourished, with every rib visible—from his vehicle before speeding off into the dark. Terrified and desperate, the dog ran onto a nearby highway. It was not long before she was struck by a car. A shelter worker found the dog struggling to stand, apparently having sustained a broken back and a crushed pelvis. The young dog was finally euthanized because of the extent of her pain and injuries.

Refusing to accept animals may make shelters’ euthanasia rates and statistics sound favorable to donors, but what happens to the unwanted animals once the shelters turn them away?

Desperate and With Nowhere to Turn

Animals that are rejected by limited-admission shelters don’t just disappear. A lucky few may end up in open-admission shelters or rescues, but many are disposed of like trash by people who are desperate to get rid of them.

They are dumped on streets or on desolate country roads, where they get injured or killed in traffic, starve, or succumb to the elements and wildlife as well as reproducing—creating even more homeless animals. Others end up spending their lives on a chain or confined to a lonely kennel in an isolated backyard. Some are violently killed or fatally neglected.

This will be the fate of thousands and thousands of animals if we as a community allow the shelter to be shut down and taken over by a limited intake organization.

“No-kill” policies don’t prevent animals from dying. They simply leave animals to die elsewhere—and often miserably. Facilities that adhere to these policies opt not to involve themselves in euthanasia by turning away animals in need, shipping animals out of state to unknown and often untraceable destinations, and/or warehousing animals in cages indefinitely.

Ironically, many “no-kill” shelters refer unwanted animals to high-intake, open-admission shelters—which take in all animals and must therefore euthanize some to make room for the steady stream of newcomers. Yet in their fundraising materials and public statements, many “no-kill” advocates and facilities condemn shelters whose workers must carry out the heartbreaking, inescapable work that “no-kill” shelters refuse to do. This siphons public support away from the facilities that help the vast majority of unwanted animals in need.

Refusing to accept animals may make shelters’ euthanasia rates and statistics sound favorable to donors, but what happens to the unwanted animals once the shelters turn them away.

THEY DO NOT DISAPPEAR - THEY DIE VIOLENTLY, LIVE ON 4 FOOT CHAINS HARDLY ABLE TO REACH A WATER BOWL IF THEY EVEN HAVE ONE, THEY DIE OF HEAT EXPOSURE, THEY ARE DUMPED AND HIT BY CARS, INJURED OR KILLED BY WILDLIFE, SHOT BY THEIR OWNERS OR OTHER PEOPLE, OR THEY STARVE TO DEATH AFTER BEEN ADBANDONED. WE ALREADY SEE THIS IN NEIGHBORING PARISHES THAT DON'T HAVE SHELTERS, PLEASE DON'T LET THIS HAPPEN HERE!!!!!

Please contact these people in the parish and make sure they know that the shelter needs to remain an open intake facility!!

We will continue to push forward helping them get more animals adopted and into rescues who will help and find homes.

We need your support today and every day until we can accomplish this goal. Please do not assume everyone else will call or sign the petition. We need your help!!!

Please share so everyone knows about this.



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