Petition Closed
Petitioning Supervisor, 1st District Susan Gorin and 5 others

Sonoma County Supervisors and Sonoma County Dept. of Health: Implement the No Kill Equation for Sonoma County Animal Care and Control


No longer will we accept this misappropriation of our tax dollars to needlessly kill companion animals when proven, and more cost-effective, lifesaving alternatives can and will work. We need a compassionate new director at SCACC. The opportunity for change is ripe, and No Kill Sonoma County is calling on the community to support this mission. SCACC is proving to be in a state of total failure. Our Shelter Animals are suffering and being killed on our tax dollars because of our County's terrible choices.

A collaboration of animal welfare advocates, no kill front-runners, and compassionate taxpaying citizens, No Kill Sonoma County is working towards one common goal: To ensure that SCACC aggressively and comprehensively implements the programs and services of the best performing open-admission shelters in the country — otherwise known as the No Kill Equation (NKE). They are as follows:

I. Feral Cat TNR Program

II. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

III. Rescue Groups

IV. Foster Care

V. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

VI. Pet Retention

VII. Medical and Behavior Rehabilitation

VIII. Public Relations/Community Involvement

IX. Volunteers

X. Proactive Redemptions

XI. A Compassionate Director

 

Letter to
Supervisor, 1st District Susan Gorin
Supervisor, 3rd District Shirley Zane
Supervisor, 4th District Mike McGuire
and 3 others
Supervisor, 5th District Efren Carrillo
Director of Health Services Rita Scardaci
Supervisor, 2nd District David Rabbit
Implement the No Kill Equation for Sonoma County Animal Care and Control
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Sonoma County Supervisors

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Last year, SCACC claimed that their statistics had greatly improved by 77%. But when you start actually looking into these numbers. These statistics have Animals that should never even be reported in these statistics. And in fact should have a outside Auditing Agency looking into these Statistics. When you can not trust the Accounting of the Shelter Animals coming from the Shelter Director for a second time in her career at Sonoma County, then it is time for a change. It is especially unacceptable when compared with the municipal shelters in cities like Reno, NV, Charlottesville, VA, Ithaca, NY, and Austin, TX, which save over 90% of all animals in their open-admission shelters.

No longer will we accept this misappropriation of our tax dollars to needlessly kill companion animals when proven, and more cost-effective, lifesaving alternatives can and will work.

The opportunity for change is ripe, and No Kill Sonoma County is calling on the community and County leaders to support our new lifesaving mission: aggressive and comprehensive implementation of the programs and services of the best performing open-admission shelters in the country — otherwise known as the No Kill Equation.

There are communities in the United States that have eliminated population control killing. We want—and the animals deserve—No Kill in Sonoma County. But it requires shelter leaders and municipal leaders committed to these goals and dedicated to diligent implementation.

Only the No Kill Equation model has achieved this success. It is a program model which changes the way shelters operate and which gives the animal loving public an integral role in that operation. If our community wants success, this is the way to go: nothing else has succeeded.

The mandatory programs and services include:

I. Feral Cat TNR Program

II. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

III. Rescue Groups

IV. Foster Care

V. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

VI. Pet Retention

VII. Medical and Behavior Rehabilitation

VIII. Public Relations/Community Involvement

IX. Volunteers

X. Proactive Redemptions

XI. A Compassionate Director

Following a commitment to No Kill is the need for accountability. Accountability means having clear definitions, a lifesaving plan, and protocols and procedures oriented toward preserving life. But accountability also allows, indeed requires, flexibility. Too many shelters lose sight of this principle, staying rigid with shelter protocols, believing these are engraved in stone. They are not. Protocols are important because they ensure accountability from staff. But protocols without flexibility can have the opposite effect: stifling innovation, causing lives to be needlessly lost, and allowing shelter employees who fail to save lives to hide behind a paper trail.

To meet the challenge that No Kill entails, shelter leadership and Sonoma County officials need to get the community excited, to energize people for the task at hand. By working with people, implementing lifesaving programs, and treating each life as precious, our shelter can transform the community.