Petitioning 10 Downing Street London Theresa May MP and 1 other

Saving our Oceans

                          Coastline Hand-cycle challenge 2017

                                        Saving Our Oceans

Starting from Brighton pier 8am 2nd July - 2017 Finish Friday 2pm Friday 28th July 2017 at 10 Downing Street London. UK.

I will cover roughly 2,500 miles in 27 days; This is a tough challenge but one of the most rewarding things I will ever do! This is also the first time a disabled hand-cyclist has ever taken on such a challenge.

Why I am is doing this? 

My aim is to raise awareness of our dying oceans.

My specific goal is to inform the British public of the global issue of climate change and plastic pollution in our oceans. To demonstrate what plastic does to our marine life and environment. This coastline challenge is important to me because plastic pollution is affecting the marine environment around our oceans and around the world. It has been proven that plastic pollution has now entered into the human food chain. My mission is to inspire everyone young and old that we can do better if we all work together. I will inform the British public what plastic does to our marine life and environment. I hope to inspire the public to change their use of plastics and to act in a more environmentally friendly way.

As i travel around the UK I will use emotional photos of turtles, dolphins, seals, whales and seabirds to get the British public emotionally drawn in. I will also included some mind blowing facts such as How long does it take for a plastic bag to disintegrate? Plastic in general takes about 1,000 years and by 2025 it is estimated that for every 2 tonnes of fish there will be 1 tonne of plastic in our oceans.

I will be gathering 100,000+ signatures from the public and schools in support of saving our oceans. I will be asking our government for more education in our schools on Climate change and plastic pollution in saving our oceans and beaches around the UK from pollution. I will hand this petition into number 10 Downing Street on Friday 28th July 2017. I will also be raising Funds for two of my favourite charities (SIA. Spinal injury association) and The Cycling Project.

We will also be asking for more education on saving our oceans to be introduced into all schools across the Globe.

You can help by asking your children to take this petition to their School and asking the head to get the school to sign the petition in saving our oceans.                                  

                                    Saving Our Oceans

Solid garbage makes its way to the ocean. Plastic bags, balloons, glass bottles, shoes, and packaging material – if not disposed of correctly, almost everything we throw away can reach the sea.

Plastic garbage, which decomposes very slowly, is often mistaken for food by marine animals with often fatal effects, by marine mammals, fish, and birds that mistake it for food. High concentrations of plastic material, particularly plastic bags, have been found blocking the breathing passages and stomachs of many marine species, including whales, dolphins, seals, puffins, and turtles. 

Today, we need look no further than our own shores a once flourishing ocean ecosystem on the brink of collapse

The oceans are so vast and deep that until fairly recently, it was widely assumed that no matter how much trash and chemicals humans dumped into them, the effects would be negligible. Proponents of dumping in the oceans even had a catchphrase: "The solution to pollution is dilution." 

Pollution is the introduction of harmful contaminants that are outside the norm for a given ecosystem. Common man-made pollutants that reach the ocean include pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, detergents, oil, sewage, plastics, and other solids. Many of these pollutants collect at the ocean's depths, where they are consumed by small marine organisms and introduced into the global food chain. Scientists are even discovering that pharmaceuticals ingested by humans but not fully processed by our bodies are eventually ending up in the fish we eat. 

Many ocean pollutants are released into the environment far upstream from coastlines. Nitrogen-rich fertilizers applied by farmers inland, for example, end up in local streams, rivers, and groundwater and are eventually deposited in estuaries, bays, and deltas. These excess nutrients can spawn massive blooms of algae that rob the water of oxygen, leaving areas where little or no marine life can exist. Scientists have counted some 400 such dead zones around the world. 

                                         Seas of garbage 

Solid garbage also makes its way to the ocean. Plastic bags, balloons, glass bottles, shoes, and packaging material – if not disposed of correctly, almost everything we throw away can reach the sea. 

Plastic garbage, which decomposes very slowly, is often mistaken for food by marine animals with often fatal effects, by marine mammals, fish, and birds that mistake it for food. High concentrations of plastic material, particularly plastic bags, have been found blocking the breathing passages and stomachs of many marine species, including whales, dolphins, seals, puffins, and turtles. Plastic six-pack rings for drink bottles can also choke marine animals. In certain regions, ocean currents corral trillions of decomposing plastic items and other trash into gigantic, swirling garbage patches. One in the North Pacific, known as the Pacific Trash Vortex, is estimated to be the size of Texas. A new, massive patch was discovered in the Atlantic Ocean in early 2010. 

This garbage can also come back to shore, where it pollutes beaches and other coastal habitats. 

The Mediterranean is probably the most polluted ocean in the world. 

The United Nations Environment Programme has estimated that 650,000,000 tons of sewage, 129,000 tons of mineral oil, 60,000 tons of mercury, 3,800 tons of lead and 36,000 tons of phosphates are dumped into the Mediterranean each year. 

Pollution is not always physical. In large bodies of water, sound waves can carry undiminished for miles. The increased presence of loud or persistent sounds from ships, sonar devices, oil rigs, and even from natural sources like earthquakes can disrupt the migration, communication, hunting, and reproduction patterns of many marine animals, particularly aquatic mammals like whales and dolphins. 

For further info follow the link below

http://www.wwf.org.uk/what_we_do/oceans_and_coasts/

 

 

 

This petition will be delivered to:
  • 10 Downing Street London
    Theresa May MP
  • 10 Downing Street, London SW1A 2AA
    Prime Minister


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