Petition Closed

Help save live entertainment in Australia!

The QLD Premier Campbell Newman has announced that the QLD Liquor Licensing Laws are about to have a major overhaul. The Attorney General has released 'The Red Tape Reduction' discussion paper inviting Queenslanders to have their say.

In 'Section 2.5: Noise controls over liquor licensed premises', it recommends easing current noise restriction policy for licensed venues, which has been officially recognised by the Government (in last year's DestinationQ Tourism Summit) as being prohibitive to business development and tourism.

This is a momentous chance to save our entertainment industry and tourism profile. Please support these reforms but signing this petition and sharing it with others!

After many hours of research and a lot of constructive input from our Facebook forum,  we submitted our proposal to the Attorney General's Office (on March 15) with several key recommendations.

Download our proposal here [PDF]. 

For more detailed information about the proposal, and latest updates please visit: facebook.com/ALERTforum

Listen to our latest radio interviews here: http://alert-forum.org/downloads/

 

 

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The Problem

The provision of live entertainment not only keeps bartenders, waitresses, security personnel, and musicians in jobs (just to name a few), it encourages an enjoyable social environment, therefore reducing the risk of anti-social and aggressive behaviour.

The 'Discussion Paper' recognises that current prohibitive OLGR (Office of Liquor and Gaming) policy is becoming severely detrimental to the entertainment industry and tourism sector.

Currently, the OLGR  enforces a venue's assigned decibel limit by measuring it 3 metres in front of the sound source (ie: the stage). Their intention is to ensure acceptable noise levels outside the venue. However, the accuracy and legitimacy of this procedure is fundamentally flawed for many reasons which are explained in detail in our proposal.

Due to these regulations, many venues have closed down or suffered major financial losses. We have also seen an increase in anti-social aggressive behaviour in and around these venues, which can be attributed largely to a lack of entertainment.

If this trend continues at its current rate, all that will be left for the next generation's live entertainment in licensed venues is TV and Poker Machines. 

Is this the future we want for an industry which has for so long been a rich part of our cultural identity essential for tourism, and the development of Australian artists? Do we want to foster a generation of problem gamblers or offer something more wholesome and inspiring?

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The Solution 

Power in numbers! Please make your voice count by signing this petition and continue to share it with everyone you know, as this affects not just those who work in the industry, but anyone who enjoys live music or is concerned about Queensland's current economic crisis. 

Collecting as many signatures as possible will help this proposal gain Government recognition throughout the approval process. 

In addition to this petition, we have created an online forum on facebook called 'Australian Live Entertainment Reform Think-Tank' (ALERT) where we would love to see you mirror your petition comments to further reinforce this issue. Here you can express your concerns and discuss any issues you may have in regards to live entertainment in Australia. 

Please like the page and become involved in the discussion @ facebook.com/ALERTforum

ALERT will continue to create more awareness of these issues through as many avenues as possible, including news media coverage. 

If you are an Australian musical identity who would like to support us by bringing some weight to this cause, please contact supportus@alert-forum.org 

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We will keep you up-to-date with any developments, and please keep the industry feedback coming through the ALERTforum Facebook page.

Thank you.

Australian Live Entertainment Reform Think-tank.

 

Letter to
qld government
Please consider our proposal in regards to reforming noise control regulation for licensed venues.