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report on elephants position in BOTSWANA

 


Under normal circumstances when Seretse Khama was the President of Botswana and the subsequent leadership of the beautiful country I would believe every word of this as the ELEPHANTS were protected by the government decree

 


Now since President Masisi came into power using typical African leadership style he issued a statement the ELEPHANTS can be hunted and that they were no longer to be protected ..blaming that the elephants were causing chaos and harm to farming and the rural population.

 


His distinct dislike for elephants is now common knowledge and he has nor realised that his decision is ruining the tourist rural industry .

 


Since he came into power the elephant population has decreased substantially.

 


I might be true that those 110 + plus possibly more( due to lack of reports)  have died due to  an unknown disease.

 


MY question is WHY IS THE BOTSWANA GOVERNMENT taking so long to establish what is killing these elephants ⁉️

When as you can see below the first report was made in

OCTOBER 2019‼️

South Africa is borders Botswana and SOUTH AFRICA have wonderful research and veterinary scientific resource and laboratories ..which could easily establish the cause ‼️

Hence I now comment that MASIS is not at all interested in letting the truth be known  ..in fact he welcomes any delay thus ensuring more elephants are killed by this unknown disease or poisoning

 


In support of my comments as no doubt their will be many especially from BOTSWANA citizens who think highly of MASIS and his evil campaign to exterminate elephants I add the following reports ...their are many similar ones and can be researched on Google etc

 


WE MUST NOT SUPPORT THE TOURISM INDUSTRY IN BOTSWANA I know it’s difficult for them to speak up against MASIS But they cannot and should not be silent on this situation

Hunting lodges in Botswana an professional hunters who organise hunting trips to kill elephants support this so they will not raise any protest ..”who cuts the hand off a man who feeds them”

philosophy applies ‼️to these lodges and profession hunters .

 


I love BOTSWANA and have been their many times ..it is a beautiful area for tourism and the best area to see wildlife and birdlife ..it is a wildlife photographer and tourist dream to see and visit areas like CHOBE. THE OKAVANGO  DELTA  And the marshlands..but not in these time when wildlife in Botswana is being in poached and killed by hunters ..true wildlife tourists   do not want to see or hear about killings ..they want to relax and photograph and look and admire the wild and bird life which is exceptional in BOTSWANA ..

 


MASIS must wake up and see the huge potential for Botswana tourism an its huge rural population in these areas  will be earning wages again .

 


In October 2019, Botswana reported that more than 100 elephants died from a suspected anthrax outbreak. Preliminary investigations then suggested the jumbos were dying from anthrax whilst some died from the effects of drought.

 


Botswana govt refutes report of mass elephant deaths

 


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By Abdur Rahman Alfa Shaban

Last updated: 05/09/2018

BOTSWANA

The government of Botswana has officially responded to a media report that suggested that close to 90 elephants had been killed in the country.

The news was connected to a conservation group, Elephants Without Borders (EWB). The group is currently leading an extensive survey of the deaths.

The government described the reports as unsubstantiated and sensational, categorically denying them. “At no point in the last months or recently were 87 or 90 elephants killed in one incident in any place in Botswana

 


“... the Government of Botswana wishes to inform members of the public and other key stakeholders that these statistics are false and misleading.”

 


To this end, the Government of Botswana wishes to inform members of the public and other key stakeholders that these statistics are false and misleading,” the government statement noted.

The statement stressed that EWB had been contracted by the government to carry out the dry season aerial survey of elephants and wildlife in northern Botswana covering Chobe, Okavango, Ngamiland and North Central District.

Describing the statistics as false and misleading, the government said the group had only reported 53 cases of elephant carcasses officially – incidents that had been brought to government’s notice in July and August.

“Of the aforementioned 53 reported, a verification mission between July and August established that the majority were not poached but rather died from natural causes and retaliatory killings as a result of human and wildlife conflicts,” the statement signed by Thato Y. Raphaka, a permanent secretary added.

Statement addresses withdrawal of weapons from anti-poaching units

The Government of Botswana wishes to state that it is unfortunate that some media reports attribute the rise in elephant poaching primarily to the withdrawal of weapons from the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP) anti-poaching unit.

The fact of the matter is that the withdrawal of such weapons from DWNP, did not in any way affect the effectiveness and operations of the anti-poaching units.

It should be noted that the Government of Botswana has from the 1980’s directed all security agencies to commit resources towards anti-poaching, a practice that continues to this date.

Therefore the withdrawal of weapons from DWNP has not created any vacuum in anti-poaching operations as the anti-poaching unit in DWNP continues to play a pivotal role in combating wildlife crime through other strategic interventions.

Furthermore the public is informed that withdrawing weapons from DWNP is in line with the existing legislation which does not allow the Department of Wildlife and National Parks to own such weapons. This action was taken whilst corrective measures are to be undertaken.

In conclusion, the Government of Botswana wishes to condemn in the strongest terms possible attempts by individuals or groups who give a false impression that they love Botswana wildlife more than citizens of Botswana.

Government wishes to reiterate the fact that wildlife remains a national heritage and our citizens will protect it at all costs.

 


The Elephants Without Borders research in the scientific journal Current Biology will likely increase pressure on Botswana, which last month sparked sparked controversy by lifting its ban on hunting saying it would help control a booming population that was damaging farmers' livelihoods.

Thursday's report noted a 593 percent increase in fresh elephant carcasses in the north of the country since 2014, with many of these found clustered in five northern "hotspots".

"This evidence suggests that ivory poaching on the scale of hundreds of elephants per year has been occurring in northern Botswana since 2017 or possibly earlier," the report said.

EWB last year said it had identified nearly 90 elephants thought to have been poached after an aerial survey, a number that was vigorously contested by the government.

The expanded study published on Thursday estimated that some 385 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2017 and 2018, with 156 confirmed as being poached last year alone.

EWB founder Dr Michael Chase, a co-author of the report, said the latest research was "indisputable and supports our warning that elephant bulls are being killed by poaching gangs".

Botswana officials were not available for comment on the latest research.

The country, which has the largest elephant population in Africa, has previously been a haven for elephants with "little poaching reported" the report said, noting that researchers had not observed any poached carcasses in a 2014 survey.

But its 2018 survey over a 94,000 square kilometre (36,000 square miles) area found 94 recent carcasses and 62 older ones that researchers verified as having been poached.

The researchers did however find that elephant populations had remained broadly stable between 2014 and 2018, at around 122,700.

Last month, Botswana President Mokgweetsi Masisi lifted the country's five-year ban on elephant hunting, citing increasing "conflicts between humans and elephants".

This decision provoked an outcry from environmental protection organisations.

Botswana's abundant wildlife has made it a popular luxury safari destination and tourism is the second fastest growing sector of the country's economy after diamond mining.

 


MAY 19, 2020

Botswana probes mysterious death of 12 elephants

 


With unfenced parks and wide-open spaces, Botswana has Africa's largest elephant population, boasting more than 135,000

Botswana is probing the mysterious deaths of a dozen elephants in the country's famed Okavango Delta, the tourism ministry said Tuesday, ruling out poaching because the animals' valuable tusks were not missing.

 


The landlocked southern African country which boasts the world's largest elephant population said 12 carcasses had been discovered over the past week in two villages in the northwest of the country.

"So far, veterinary officers have ruled out the possibility of poaching because all carcasses of the elephants were found intact," Oduetse Koboto, the tourism ministry's acting permanent secretary, said in a statement.

A search is under way for more dead pachyderms.

In October 2019, Botswana reported that more than 100 elephants died from a suspected anthrax outbreak.

Preliminary investigations then suggested the jumbos were dying from anthrax whilst some died from the effects of drought.

With unfenced parks and wide-open spaces, Botswana has the world's largest elephant population, boasting more than 135,000 animals—about a third of the African continent's total.

Leading conservation Elephants Without Borders last year warned of surging elephant poaching in parts of Botswana, estimating that nearly 400 were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018.

In February this year the government auctioned off seven elephant hunting licenses after it controversially lifted a hunting ban saying the move would not threaten the elephant population.

The hunting season was supposed to open in April but it was put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.

 


Hundreds' of elephants being poached each year in Botswana: report

 


The report noted a 593 percent increase in fresh elephant carcasses since 2014 in the north of Botswana, which last month sparked controversy by lifting its ban on hunting

A leading conservation group has warned of surging elephant poaching in parts of Botswana and estimated nearly 400 were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018, according to a report published Thursday, adding to conservation concerns.

 


REPORT AND RESEARCH BY ROB WEAVER

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