Confirmed victory

Increase funding for brain tumor research Greetings, Know the Issues Brain Tumor Advocacy Facts There are over 600,000 people in the US living with a primary brain tumor diagnosis. More than 60,000 adults and children will be newly diagnosed this year. Because brain tumors are located at the control center for thought, emotion and movement, their effects on an individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating. Complex, damaging, and too-often deadly: Because brain tumors are located at the control center for thought, emotion and movement, their effects on an individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating. The five-year survival rate after diagnosis with a primary malignant brain/central nervous system tumor is 35.10%. The five-year survival rate for glioblastoma, the most common and deadly brain tumor, is 4.46%. Brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in children under the age of 20, and are the third leading cause of death from cancer in young adults ages 20-39. Brain tumors may be either malignant or non-malignant (“benign”), but can be life-threatening in either case. Difficulties in detection, treatment, and quality of life: There are few known risk factors for brain tumors and no strategies for early detection. Symptoms of brain tumors can be attributed to other conditions, leading to delays in diagnosis. Treatment is complex and even when it is successful in treating the tumor, it can result in damage to the brain and devastating after-affects. Treatment of brain tumors is complicated by fact that there are more than 120 different types of tumors and because of the tumor’s location. Treatment options for brain tumor patients are limited.  Long-term changes in quality of life following brain tumor treatment are common and can include impairments to physical and cognitive functioning which impact not only the patient, but their loved-ones. Brain tumors are often financially devastating, not only because of the cost of treatment but because the impact of tumor and treatment on the brain frequently make it difficult for brain tumor survivors to work. How Congress Can Help: Important advances have recently been made in understanding brain tumors, including the genetic characterization of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of brain tumor, but much work remains to be done before better therapies are available. There still remain daunting obstacles to the development of new treatments and there are no strategies for screening or early detection of brain tumors. Congress can help fight brain tumors by increasing investment in the National Institutes for Health and National Cancer Institute, and by maintaining investment in the Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program, a part of the Department of Defense.  By increasing the amount of research on brain tumors, patients, caregivers, and all Americans will benefit from new therapies, and hopefully cures. Donna Amati

Letter to
State Representative Jason Conger
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500 President Barack Obama and U.S. Senators and Congress
Oregon Secretary of State • 136 State Capitol • Salem, OR 97310-0722
and 1 other
Knute Buehler for Secretary of State 1863 Pioneer Pkwy E Suite 610 Springfield, OR 97477–3907

Know the Issues
Brain Tumor Advocacy Facts

There are over 600,000 people in the US living with a primary brain tumor diagnosis.
More than 60,000 adults and children will be newly diagnosed this year.

Because brain tumors are located at the control center for thought, emotion and movement, their effects on an individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating.

Complex, damaging, and too-often deadly:

Because brain tumors are located at the control center for thought, emotion and movement, their effects on an individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating.
The five-year survival rate after diagnosis with a primary malignant brain/central nervous system tumor is 35.10%. The five-year survival rate for glioblastoma, the most common and deadly brain tumor, is 4.46%.
Brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in children under the age of 20, and are the third leading cause of death from cancer in young adults ages 20-39.
Brain tumors may be either malignant or non-malignant (“benign”), but can be life-threatening in either case.

Difficulties in detection, treatment, and quality of life:

There are few known risk factors for brain tumors and no strategies for early detection. Symptoms of brain tumors can be attributed to other conditions, leading to delays in diagnosis. Treatment is complex and even when it is successful in treating the tumor, it can result in damage to the brain and devastating after-affects.

Treatment of brain tumors is complicated by fact that there are more than 120 different types of tumors and because of the tumor’s location.
Treatment options for brain tumor patients are limited. 
Long-term changes in quality of life following brain tumor treatment are common and can include impairments to physical and cognitive functioning which impact not only the patient, but their loved-ones.
Brain tumors are often financially devastating, not only because of the cost of treatment but because the impact of tumor and treatment on the brain frequently make it difficult for brain tumor survivors to work.

How Congress Can Help:

Important advances have recently been made in understanding brain tumors, including the genetic characterization of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of brain tumor, but much work remains to be done before better therapies are available.
There still remain daunting obstacles to the development of new treatments and there are no strategies for screening or early detection of brain tumors.
Congress can help fight brain tumors by increasing investment in the National Institutes for Health and National Cancer Institute, and by maintaining investment in the Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program, a part of the Department of Defense.  By increasing the amount of research on brain tumors, patients, caregivers, and all Americans will benefit from new therapies, and hopefully cures.