Petition Closed

It is vital that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issue a recall on these treats for the health and safety of beloved family pets.

In November 2011, U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a cautionary update regarding dog treats that were manufactured in China due to an increase in complaints from consumers that reported sudden illness resulting in the death of their beloved family pets. Vets and pet owners suspect that the onset of illness and death are associated with chicken jerky products that are imported from China. Intended for dogs, these dried chicken jerky treats are sold as tenders, strips or treats and are believed to cause decreased appetite and activity; diarrhea (some cases bloody stools); vomiting; increased water consumption and or/urination, indicative of kidney failure including Fanconi-like syndrome. All reported illnesses and death have occurred within hours to days of the dogs consuming these dried chicken treats imported from China. Although some dogs seem to have recovered just fine, others reports stated that the dogs died from eating the chicken jerky treats.

Such cautionary warnings regarding chicken jerky products date as far back as 2007, as well as a Preliminary Animal Health Notification in December of 2008. The number of complaints received seemed to diminish beginning in late 2009 and most of 2010, but beginning in 2011 the FDA began receiving complaints once again prompting a level of concern. Since November 18, 2011, numerous complaints have been received by the FDA regarding the same chicken jerky products.

Although the FDA continues to investigate the origin of the illnesses and death, these treats remain on store shelves and for those pet owners who are unaware of the possible dangers that these treats are suspected of causing, there are many pets at risk of illness or death from them. If the FDA continues to urge pet owners to exercise caution when purchasing dog treats imported from China, does it not seem like the logical thing to do by pulling these treats off of store shelves as a precautionary measure until tests determine what is causing these illnesses and deaths? It is many pet owners opinions that, if the FDA advises being cautious and keeping a close watch on dogs after eating these products, that even the FDA is not fully convinced these products are safe for our pets to eat. Even under close watch, once an animal goes into kidney failure, it is highly unlikely that they will survive it. How many more dogs have to die before action is taken?

Following is a list of dog treats imported from China: 

  • Waggin Train
  • Canyon Creek Ranch
  • Dogswell
  • Booda Bones – Aspen Pet
  • Milo’s Kitchen
  • American Kennel Club
  • Hartz
  • Dingos
  • Beefeaters
  • Cadet
  • Sargents
  • Ever Pet (Dollar General)
  • Home Pet 360
  • Walgreen’s new brand – Simple
  • TheKingdomPets
Letter to
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
I just signed the following petition addressed to: U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Recall all pet treats made in China

It is vital that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issue a recall on these treats for the health and safety of beloved family pets.

In November 2011, U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a cautionary update regarding dog treats that were manufactured in China due to an increase in complaints from consumers that reported sudden illness resulting in the death of their beloved family pets. Vets and pet owners suspect that the onset of illness and death are associated with chicken jerky products that are imported from China. Intended for dogs, these dried chicken jerky treats are sold as tenders, strips or treats and are believed to cause decreased appetite and activity; diarrhea (some cases bloody stools); vomiting; increased water consumption and or/urination, indicative of kidney failure including Fanconi-like syndrome. All reported illnesses and death have occurred within hours to days of the dogs consuming these dried chicken treats imported from China. Although some dogs seem to have recovered just fine, others reports stated that the dogs died from eating the chicken jerky treats.

Such cautionary warnings regarding chicken jerky products date as far back as 2007, as well as a Preliminary Animal Health Notification in December of 2008. The number of complaints received seemed to diminish beginning in late 2009 and most of 2010, but beginning in 2011 the FDA began receiving complaints once again prompting a level of concern. Since November 18, 2011, numerous complaints have been received by the FDA regarding the same chicken jerky products.

Although the FDA continues to investigate the origin of the illnesses and death, these treats remain on store shelves and for those pet owners who are unaware of the possible dangers that these treats are suspected of causing, there are many pets at risk of illness or death from them. If the FDA continues to urge pet owners to exercise caution when purchasing dog treats imported from China, does it not seem like the logical thing to do by pulling these treats off of store shelves as a precautionary measure until tests determine what is causing these illnesses and deaths? It is many pet owners opinions that, if the FDA advises being cautious and keeping a close watch on dogs after eating these products, that even the FDA is not fully convinced these products are safe for our pets to eat. Even under close watch, once an animal goes into kidney failure, it is highly unlikely that they will survive it.
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Sincerely,