Petition Closed

Facebook has announced plans to eliminate all federal and state tax obligations for 2012 in its IPO filing, and actually receive a tax refund of at least $500 million instead of paying taxes.

At a time when literally millions of American families are losing their jobs to state spending cuts, when kids are being pushed into bigger classrooms because of education cuts, when cops and firefighters are getting laid off because of public safety cuts, it's immoral and unethical for a highly-profitable company like Facebook to dodge their tax obligations simply because corporate tax loopholes are there to be exploited.

Just because corporate tax loopholes are legal doesn't make them ethical. At certain points in history, slavery, segregation and child labor were all legal practices-- but eventually enough people came forward and demanded change. And ordinary taxpayers like us are of the opinion that a billion-dollar corporation's tax obligations should be more than the crumpled dollar bill in our pockets.

Tax dollars fund the salaries of teachers, police, firefighters, construction workers, social workers and other essential parts of society. And when the public is starved of those tax revenues, the public suffers, as do the services the public uses and depends on every day. We all love to use Facebook, but we expect our favorite social networking sites to pay their fair share of taxes like the rest of us.

Letter to
Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook CEO
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook CEO.

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Stop abusing tax loopholes and pay your fair share

Facebook has announced plans to eliminate all federal and state tax obligations for 2012 in its IPO filing, and actually receive a tax refund of at least $500 million instead of paying taxes.

At a time when literally millions of American families are losing their jobs to state spending cuts, when kids are being pushed into bigger classrooms because of education cuts, when cops and firefighters are getting laid off because of public safety cuts, it's immoral and unethical for a highly-profitable company like Facebook to dodge their tax obligations simply because corporate tax loopholes are there to be exploited.

Just because corporate tax loopholes are legal doesn't make them ethical. At certain points in history, slavery, segregation and child labor were all legal practices-- but eventually enough people came forward and demanded change. And ordinary taxpayers like us are of the opinion that a billion-dollar corporation's tax obligations should be more than the crumpled dollar bill in our pockets.

Tax dollars fund the salaries of teachers, police, firefighters, construction workers, social workers and other essential parts of society. And when the public is starved of those tax revenues, the public suffers, as do the services the public uses and depends on every day. We all love to use Facebook, but we expect our favorite social networking sites to pay their fair share of taxes like the rest of us.
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Sincerely,