Petition Closed

In 1994, Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley were wrongfully convicted of a triple homicide in West Memphis, Arkansas. For sixteen years, all their appeals had been denied. On September 30th, 2010, oral arguments were heard for Damien in Little Rock and on November 4th, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that all three men would be given the chance to present new evidence before Judge David N. Laser at an evidentiary hearing in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on December 5th, 2011.

On August 19, 2011, Baldwin, Echols and Misskelley were released from prison. Their freedom was based upon a plea agreement with Craighead County prosecutor Scott Ellington, in which, while maintaining their innocence, the three agreed to an Alford plea to the original charges. They were released based upon time served. The three men appeared before Judge David N. Laser, in Craighead County Court in Jonesboro, Arkansas. As part of the plea agreement, Damien Echols capital murder conviction was vacated.

Ellington openly admitted that the State had little or no chance of securing the same guilty verdicts which were handed down in 1994, should the men be retried. He stated “I believe that allegations of misconduct on behalf of a juror in the Echols-Baldwin trial would likely result in a new trial being ordered either by the circuit court or federal court. I further believe it would be practically impossible to put on a proper case against the defendants in this particular case after eighteen years of extended litigation.”

These men are innocent of the crimes they were convicted of and should be exonerated and given a full pardon so as they may be relieved of the stigma the State has attached to them as they, and their families, attempt to rebuild their lives.

Thank you all very much for your participation and ongoing support.

Stuart Faulks.

 

Letter to
Governor of Arkansas Mike Beebe
Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel
I just signed the following petition addressed to:

Governor Mike Beebe
State Capitol Room 250
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-682-2345

Arkansas Attorney General
Dustin McDaniel
323 Center Street, Suite 200
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
(501) 682 2007
1-800-482-8982
----------------

It is with the utmost respect that I write to you with the intention of seeing true justice being afforded to Jason Baldwin, Jessie Misskelley and Damien Echols (the WM3 or West Memphis Three)

In 1994, Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley were wrongfully convicted of a triple homicide in West Memphis, Arkansas. For sixteen years, all their appeals had been denied. On September 30th, 2010, oral arguments were heard for Damien in Little Rock and on November 4th, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that all three men would be given the chance to present new evidence before Judge David N. Laser at an evidentiary hearing in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on December 5th, 2011.

On August 19, 2011, Baldwin, Echols and Misskelley were released from prison. Their freedom was based upon a plea agreement with Craighead County prosecutor Scott Ellington, in which, while maintaining their innocence, the three agreed to an 'Alford' plea to the original charges, whilst maintaining their innocence. They were released based upon time served. The three men appeared before Judge David N. Laser, in Craighead County Court in Jonesboro, Arkansas. As part of the plea agreement, Damien Echols capital murder conviction was vacated.

Ellington openly admitted that the State had little or no chance of securing the same guilty verdicts which were handed down in 1994, should the men be retried. He stated “I believe that allegations of misconduct on behalf of a juror in the Echols/Baldwin trial would likely result in a new trial being ordered either by the circuit court or federal court. I further believe it would be practically impossible to put on a proper case against the defendants in this particular case after eighteen years of extended litigation". He also maintained that owing to the passing of certain "key witnesses" something that is in fact false, the State of Arkansas was in no way able to re convict, much less uphold the original convictions, should the 'WM3' be retried.

Much work is still afoot to see these men pardoned, and will not cease until that end is achieved.

These men are innocent of the crimes they were convicted of and should be exonerated and given a full pardon so as they may be relieved of the stigma the State has attached to them as they, and their families, attempt to rebuild their lives.


Sincerely,