Petition Closed
Petitioning Governor Ted Strickland and 8 others

Oppose Ohio Exotic Pet Ban: Exclude Primates Under 20 Pounds


As American citizens we have our rights and should have the freedom to own the animals of our choice. Although FAIR regulation should be put into thought for larger exotics, passing a ban on exotic pets will not solve anything. There have been very few exotic animal attacks, but when there is one, it is splashed all over the news and Internet. Responsible owners should not be punished from very few irresponsible accounts. Fair regulation should be put into thought instead of jumping to the conclusion that banning all exotics will solve everything. Exotic pets show far more love and affection then regular house pets do, and people that can spend the high dollar on them in the first place can certainly afford to properly care for them and give them the love and attention they need and deserve. The part of the Exotic Pet Ban that bugs everyone the most is the primate portion.

Although there should be fair regulation implemented on larger exotics instead of a ban, there should be few to no regulations on monkeys. Monkeys are very small weighing between one and twenty pounds. They are hardly dangerous and an attack from a monkey is very rare, and can be categorized as little as pulling someones hair. Monkeys should be taken off of this ban all together as they pose little to no threat to the public. In general pet monkeys are not aggressive like the apes can be. Please exclude primates under 20 pounds from this Bill.

Every year there are thousands of attacks and even deaths caused by pet dogs and house cats, and there has yet to be a death caused by a pet monkey. Although exotic pets are not well known to everyone, passing a ban on them will only create more problems. Please oppose the Ohio exotic pet ban!

FACTS:

There has been only 22 occurrences in Ohio involving Exotic Animals in the past 7 YEARS!

Out of the 22 instances, there are only 3 involving primates.

These 3 primate instances include:

July 2005 (Noble County): A pet macaque escaped from an enclosure, jumped into a truck, bit a man, and fled.

(This was another case of irresponsible owners. The man driving the truck must have stopped to look at or to get the monkeys attention because there is NO WAY a Macaque could jump into a moving vehicle without seriously injuring itself.)

October 2006 (Butler County): A man was bitten by his pet macaque monkey, who he received that day.

(This was the owner's fault. The man was bitten by an ADULT monkey which had
NEVER knew him before, wasn't previously kept as a pet and was very scared.)

July 2010 (Medina County): A truck driver's pet monkey escaped when the truck went into a ditch. Troopers
eventually coaxed the monkey down from a utility pole.

(This monkey did not even act aggressive towards the public. It was only scared and ran up a utility pole just as a scared cat would have. People say it made that day memorable and thought that it didn't pose any threat to them!)

 

Letter to
Governor Ted Strickland
State Representative Linda Bolon
State Senator Kris Jordan
and 6 others
State Representative Kris Jordan
State Representative Matt Patten
State Representative Tim Brown
Ohio State House
Ohio State Senate
Ohio Governor
As American citizens we have our rights and should have the freedom to own the animals of our choice. Although FAIR regulation should be put into thought for larger exotics, passing a ban on exotic pets will not solve anything. There have been very few exotic animal attacks, but when there is one, it is splashed all over the news and Internet. Responsible owners should not be punished from very few irresponsible accounts. Fair regulation should be put into thought instead of jumping to the conclusion that banning all exotics will solve everything. Exotic pets show far more love and affection then regular house pets do, and people that can spend the high dollar on them in the first place can certainly afford to properly care for them and give them the love and attention they need and deserve. The part of the Exotic Pet Ban that bugs everyone the most is the primate portion.

Although there should be fair regulation implemented on larger exotics instead of a ban, there should be few to no regulations on monkeys. Monkeys are very small weighing between one and twenty pounds. They are hardly dangerous and an attack from a monkey is very rare, and can be categorized as little as pulling someones hair. Monkeys should be taken off of this ban all together as they pose little to no threat to the public. In general pet monkeys are not aggressive like the apes can be. Please exclude primates under 20 pounds from this Bill.

Every year there are thousands of attacks and even deaths caused by pet dogs and house cats, and there has yet to be a death caused by a pet monkey. Although exotic pets are not well known to everyone, passing a ban on them will only create more problems. Please oppose the Ohio exotic pet ban!

FACTS:

There has been only 22 occurrences in Ohio involving Exotic Animals in the past 7 YEARS!

Out of the 22 instances, there are only 3 involving primates.

These 3 primate instances include:

July 2005 (Noble County): A pet macaque escaped from an enclosure, jumped into a truck, bit a man, and fled.

(This was another case of irresponsible owners. The man driving the truck must have stopped to look at or to get the monkeys attention because there is NO WAY a Macaque could jump into a moving vehicle without seriously injuring itself.)

October 2006 (Butler County): A man was bitten by his pet macaque monkey, who he received that day.

(This was the owner's fault. The man was bitten by an ADULT monkey which had
NEVER knew him before, wasn't previously kept as a pet and was very scared.)

July 2010 (Medina County): A truck driver's pet monkey escaped when the truck went into a ditch. Troopers
eventually coaxed the monkey down from a utility pole.

(This monkey did not even act aggressive towards the public. It was only scared and ran up a utility pole just as a scared cat would have. People say it made that day memorable and thought that it didn't pose any threat to them!)