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Petitioning NEW YORK TIMES and 3 others

Fire Nicholas Kristof from the New York Times for Fraud, lying about Sex Trafficking, and Somaly Mam to trick people to send money under false pretenses!

We want Nicholas Kristof fired from the New York Times newspaper and lawsuits filed against him for committing fraud and stealing money from the public by providing them with false sex trafficking horror stories that were lies to send money to the Somaly Mam and Afesip charities.  These charities then committed human trafficking themselves by forcing women and girls to stay in their (rescue) centers against their will and to lie about being forced into sex trafficking to the western media and donors. 

Please write the editor of the New York Times below to remove Nicholas Kristof from being a writer for the New York Times. 

 Margaret Sullivan, Public Editor

620 8th Ave
New York, NY 10018
Email: public@nytimes.com

Contact links to NY Times

http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/contact/directory.html#paper

We are calling for The New York Times, for Nicholas Kristof to be fired and to “give readers a full explanation” of his reporting on Somaly Mam, the celebrated Cambodian anti-sex-trafficking activist who, according to a recentNewsweek expose, fabricated her entire life story and those of the alleged victims she advocated for. The revelations have disillusioned many of Mam’s loyal supporters and left the press looking gullible. Just as importantly, they’ve highlighted the public’s seemingly insatiable desire for heroic narratives—and the willingness of many in the media to trick the public and provide them even if they are fake. 

"It appears Nicholas Kristof knew, long before most, that journalists were calling Pross’s story into question. On October 15, 2012, a week and a half before theCambodia Daily story went to press, SMF board member Brandee Barker emailed Marks with a warning. “I also spoke with Nick Kristof yesterday about my concern for the way you choose to report,” Barker wrote. “I suggested that, curiously, you seem to have it out for Somaly, other survivors of sex trafficking and the Foundation. He suggested he broker a meeting with your Editor in Chief. We're considering this advice.” Barker, a former head of global communications at Facebook, subsequently confirmed to me that she had conversations with Kristof about Marks’s story prior to publication."

"No reporter went quite as far as Kristof in elevating Mam’s profile. The crusading journalist has promoted her work in half a dozen columns and blog posts, as well as his documentary, Half the Sky. He even penned the foreword to her autobiography, The Road of Lost Innocence, in which he called her “the Harriet Tubman of Southeast Asia’s brothels.”

-Pat Joseph

The Atlantic

Kristof appeared with Somaly Mam at many fund raising events. He acted as her press, marketing and celebrity agent. It seemed like Kristof was working for Somaly Mam. Was he getting a kick-back from her?  Why was he doing all this work for her?

Of riding shotgun with Mam on a raid of one of those brothels—a stunt he also “live-tweeted” to his million-plus followers and filmed for inclusion in Half the Sky—Kristof wrote in his column of November 12, 2011:

Against my better judgment, I found myself the other day charging into a well-armed brothel in a police raid. But I was comforted to be with one of my heroes, Somaly Mam.

Somaly dedicates her life to battling forced prostitution, for she herself was sold as a child to a Cambodian brothel. After enduring torture and rapes, Somaly escaped and reinvented herself as an anti-trafficking activist.

That last bit is an accurate capsule summary of the story Mam tells in her memoir and the one she has dutifully recounted (albeit with some discrepancies) in countless public appearances around the world, including at the White House and the UN. It’s also, as we know from Newsweek's story, largely untrue.

According to the article’s author, Simon Marks, during the years Somaly Mam was supposedly trapped in a Phnom Penh brothel she was actually attending school in her hometown of Thloc Chhroy. Her fellow villagers remember her as a happy, pig-tailed teenager. In her memoir, Mam claims she was orphaned at a young age and brought to Thloc Chhroy by a man she called “grandfather”—the man who sold her into slavery. The former commune chief remembered her arrival differently. “Somaly came here with her parents,” he said. “She is a daughter of Mam Khon and Pen Navy.” No one recalled the mysterious ‘grandfather’ figure.

 Not only had Somaly Mam not been an orphaned trafficking victim – she grew up with both parents and graduated from high school – but she also forced, encouraged, coached and paid girls to lie as well. One of these girls was Long Pross, who, actually lost her eye to a tumor and was sent to Afesip for vocational training. The same was reportedly true of Meas Ratha, a teenager allegedly coached by Mam to say she had been trafficked when in fact she was sent to Afesip by an impoverished farming family.  These two girls were never prostitutes and never forced sex trafficking victims. 

Extreme scenarios Mam often invoked - girls put in cages, tortured with electricity, having their eyes gouged out by pimps. “We never encountered any such thing, and we certainly looked for it,” the study’s author, Thomas Steinfatt, said this week. “We couldn’t find any instances of that … In terms of people tortured, I think they’ve been watching too many movies.” Somaly Mam was never sold for sex. Nor was Long Pross. When Pross was 13, a nonmalignant tumor which covered her eye was surgically removed. There were no electrical currants. No rape. No torture. No piece of metal gouged deeply into her eye. Those were lies. Lies propagated by Somaly Mam and lies encouraged by the Western media with Nicholas Kristof who had been captivated by increasingly fake horrific tales of sexual predation.  

Phnom Penh, Cambodia - In early 2011, Srey Mao, 28, and two friends were captured and taken to a shelter run by Afesip, a Cambodian organisation that prides itself on helping sex-trafficking victims.

There was just one problem: The women claim they hadn’t actually been trafficked. Instead, the women said they were willing sex workers who had been rounded up off the street during a police raid and sent to Afesip, headed by the internationally renowned anti-sex-slavery crusader Somaly Mam with funding from the foundation that bears her name. They said they were confined there against their will for months as purported victims of sex trafficking. Srey Mao claimed that she, her friends and a number of other sex workers in the centrer were instructed by a woman to tell foreign visitors they had been trafficked.“I was confined against my will by Somaly Mam,” Srey Mao said on Saturday. The person she said instructed ordered her and others to lie was Somaly Mam.

 When it comes to Sex trafficking the only people the media speak with are the anti-sex trafficking organizations or zealous politicians and no one else.  This is a biased one-sided conversation.  The media will never question, check or research any of the claims that these groups make. Always taking their word for it and never once researching or questioning their statistics or anything they say.  This results in misleading and false reporting by the media and news organizations.

Prostitutes are NOT forced! They do sex work of their own free will. The media, NGO’s and government officials will never admit this or ask the sex workers rights groups or prostitutes themselves about the sex industry.

Here are some good websites about this:

http://bebopper76.wordpress.com/

http://humantraffickingstatistics.wordpress.com/

 http://www.lauraagustin.com/

 

http://www.policeprostitutionandpolitics.com/  

 

 http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/06/somaly-mam-scandal-victims-can-lie/372188/

This petition was delivered to:
  • NEW YORK TIMES
  • Margaret Sullivan
    Public editor
  • Executive Editor New York Times
  • Publisher
    Arthur Sulzberger


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