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Give NYS families the right to seek treatment for loved ones suffering from addiction.

This petition had 38,079 supporters


Imagine a deadly disease that twists the brains of its victims, driving them to shun treatment at all costs. Addiction is that horrific disease. Typically, sufferers do not seek treatment until their lives are destroyed and their health severely compromised. New York families need the tools to fight this insidious malady before that level of havoc is reached.

By signing this petition, I am urging the NY State Assembly to draft and approve an Addiction Intervention Directive (AID) law that would allow individuals to obtain court-ordered-and-monitored intervention/assessment/stabilization (or detox) and long-term treatment for their addicted loved ones who refuse to seek treatment.

This Addiction Intervention Directive should be structured similarly to the Marchman Act that has made such a significant positive impact in Florida.

This directive will help NY fight a dangerous and costly epidemic. The prevalence of heroin use alone in New York State exceeded the national rate by 49% in 2013-14 (most recent year figures were available). The US Department of Justice estimated the annual economic impact of substance abuse  at  $193 billion nationally in 2007. The Washington State institute for Public Policy estimates that evidence-based treatment can return $3.77 in benefits per dollar invested. Evidence has shown that treatment need not be voluntary to be effective. Transforming addicts into productive tax payers makes good economic sense for New York State.

Draft and approve this essential legislation NOW. Lives are at stake.



Today: WNY Coalition for Excellence in Substance Abuse Recovery is counting on you

WNY Coalition for Excellence in Substance Abuse Recovery needs your help with “New York State House: Give NYS families the right to seek treatment for loved ones suffering from addiction.”. Join WNY Coalition for Excellence in Substance Abuse Recovery and 38,078 supporters today.