Petition Closed

After our fellow SPARK Movement activist Julia won her campaign to get Seventeen Magazine to pledge to stop altering their models and show more diversity on their pages, we decided to start our own campaign asking one of our favorite magazines, Teen Vogue, to make the same commitment.

We got over 45,000 signatures, were featured on CNN, CBS, and in The New York Times, and we even got a meeting with Teen Vogue Editor-In-Chief Amy Astley. But at that meeting, she told us that we, teen girls, didn’t know what we were talking about when it comes to her magazine for teen girls. She told us to “go do your homework.”

We’ve done our homework. Teen Vogue still falls miserably short of what we’d like to see in a magazine for us: real, unaltered girls of all shapes, races, hair textures, and ability. And they still refuse to make a statement promising to get better. They’ve basically chosen to ignore the fact that the girls who are supposed to be part of their reading demographic are unhappy with their magazine and the message that it sends to girls. So instead of choosing to step down from this campaign, we’re turning to a few of our favorite brands who advertise with the magazine - Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax - to ask them who they stand with: real teen girls or Teen Vogue?

Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax are brands that are beloved by teenage girls - and they’re some of Teen Vogue’s biggest advertisers. Like us,their mission is to have young girls feel their best. As young women who are concerned about how altered images and never seeing anything on the pages of magazines but thin, white women impact girls’ self-esteem, we want to support companies who want to help girls be happy and confident-and ask for them to support us as well. We’re asking Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax to commit to not advertising with Teen Vogue until the magazine makes a commitment show real, unaltered girls of all races, shapes, and sizes.

We’re asking Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax to stand with real teen girls as we continue our campaign. Will you sign our petition and stand with us too?

Letter to
Neutrogena Media Relations Neutrogena
Clean & Clear Media Relations Clean & Clear
Velvet Gogol Bennett, P & G External Relations Tampax
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Teen Vogue Advertisers.

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Stand With Teen Girls!

After our fellow SPARK Movement activist Julia won her campaign to get Seventeen Magazine to pledge to stop altering their models and show more diversity on their pages, we decided to start our own campaign asking one of our favorite magazines, Teen Vogue, to make the same commitment.

We got over 45,000 signatures, were featured on CNN, CBS, and in The New York Times, and we even got a meeting with Teen Vogue Editor-In-Chief Amy Astley. But at that meeting, she told us that we, teen girls, didn’t know what we were talking about when it comes to her magazine for teen girls. She told us to “go do your homework.”

We’ve done our homework. Teen Vogue still falls miserably short of what we’d like to see in a magazine for us: real, unaltered girls of all shapes, races, hair textures, and ability. And they still refuse to make a statement promising to get better. They’ve basically chosen to ignore the fact that the girls who are supposed to be part of their reading demographic are unhappy with their magazine and the message that it sends to girls. So instead of choosing to step down from this campaign, we’re turning to a few of our favorite brands who advertise with the magazine - Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax - to ask them who they stand with: real teen girls or Teen Vogue?

Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax are brands that are beloved by teenage girls - and they’re some of Teen Vogue’s biggest advertisers. Like us,their mission is to have young girls feel their best. As young women who are concerned about how altered images and never seeing anything on the pages of magazines but thin, white women impact girls’ self-esteem, we want to support companies who want to help girls be happy and confident-and ask for them to support us as well. We’re asking Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax to commit to not advertising with Teen Vogue until the magazine makes a commitment show real, unaltered girls of all races, shapes, and sizes.

We’re asking Clean & Clear, Neutrogena, and Tampax to stand with real teen girls as we continue our campaign. Will you sign our petition and stand with us too?

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Sincerely,