Ghanaian girls should be allowed to keep their afro hairs

Ghanaian girls should be allowed to keep their afro hairs

0 have signed. Let’s get to 1,000!
At 1,000 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!
E M started this petition to Ministry of Education and

 THE BOLDNESS AND BEAUTY OF AFRICAN WOMEN

The blackness of our skin; our feminine strength; our motherly virtues are wonderful traits of African women. Each characteristic stands out in every true African woman; everyone who observes African women will attest to this fact ardently.

In addition to these wonderful features which is unique and with no doubt shows a woman is truly African, is our thick, bold, beautiful, gravity-defying afro hair. Totally different from the hair of the whites, the messy, tangled, gravity-defying mane of hair on the heads of African women gives them a bold, daring look, same as that of a strong, independent, beautiful lion. Saying African women are lions may be controversial, but an African woman is always ready to fight for her household and care for them just like how a lion defends its territory against intruders and scavengers. She will never allow her house-her territory-and family face any dangers on her watch.

Kenyan, South African, Nigerian, Ghanaian women, basically, women in all the fifty-four African countries have been blessed with rich, thick, beautiful afro hair. Most African traditional communities have special braids, done intricately with thread., and woven into sophisticated patterns; each hairstyle had a purpose, for instance, in some communities, unmarried women have unique hairdos. In the past, hairstyles could tell one's tribe, social status, and tribe: a significant part of African culture. The afro hairstyle, which emerged in the 1960s, was a symbol of rebellion, pride, and empowerment of the black people against racial segregation and oppression. Black people accepted their hair more and stayed away from damaging products, but they were met with resistance. For instance, black students were told their natural hairs were a violation of school policy, a 12-year old Vanessa VanDyke was threatened with expulsion from her private school in Orlando, Florida because her natural hair was deemed as a "distraction". Many blacks tried to make their hairs straighten their hairs to fit into the mainstream because of the pressure; they were compelled to smoothen their hair and texturize it to fit better in society. They had to almost burn their scalp, so they could comb their natural hairs back. In almost all African schools, girls are required to shave hairs to a low, decent cut on the account that it promotes decency and helps increase our focus in school. Decency is a behavior that conforms to accepted standards of morality or respectability. Basically being decent, shows you are well mannered. Decency can be shown in our speech, behavior, and dressing but in this case, our focus is on decent dressing. Every student must be decent; neatly ironed uniform, white socks, black shoes, and kempt hair: the perfect look of a student. But can't our afro hairs be made neat without cutting all our hair entirely?

The claim about how cutting our afro promotes concentration in class is one that is dubious. Apparently, students tend to play with their hair in class, so to avoid that "distraction", shaving our hair will help boost our concentration and thereby, produce good grades. Considering other countries, for instance, the USA, most people have silk, shoulder-length hair which will pose to be more a "distraction" than our gravity-defying mane of hair. Most high school American girls like to wear their hair down; it promotes a sense of confidence in them. In contrast to what is believed in Ghana, students in America and other European countries still come out with good grades. The latest data from Pew Research Center uses U.S Census Bureau data to show that in 2012, 71 percent of female high school graduates went to college, compared to 61 percent of their counterparts. In 1994, the figures were 63 and 61 percent respectively. Girls still show good academic performance even with their silky, shoulder-length, so what about Ghanaian girls with their bushy, gravity-defying afro?

In one South African high school, Pretoria High School, a thirteen-year-old girl, Zulaikha Patel protested the policy regarding black hair. The hairs of black girls were referred to as untidy and the school authorities ordered for hairs to be relaxed, held into pony-tails so that it conforms to the uniform of the school. Zulaikha said asking her to change her hair is like asking her to erase her blackness: her bold, beautiful afro. In Ghana, we are facing a case where girls are required to cut their hair as a general school rule. Hair must be cut low; some haircuts also give girls a boyish hairline shape. This erases our feminine identity; our blackness; our bold, beautiful hair.

Why is not possible for Ghanaian school girls to keep their beautiful, bold, bushy afros and go to school, learn, and be the best they can be? Because it has been proven that hairs on our heads have no effect on our academic performance. Hairs can be braided into all-back styles such as corn-rows to avoid any disturbances when they are learning. Hair can also be trimmed at the tips to give a neat afro. There would not be any need to completely shave our beautiful afros.

0 have signed. Let’s get to 1,000!
At 1,000 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!