Victory

Keep our diabetic children safe in schools! Support House Bill 1625!

This petition made change with 234 supporters!


Currently children with diabetes, specifically type 1 diabetes have little protection in schools. They current law was written in 1949!

Type 1 diabetics do not produce any insulin. No amount of exercise, eating habits or medication will change this! If they do not take insulin every day, they will die. 

Please tell your PA representative you support House Bill 1625 that updates and gives support providing for definitions and providing for education of school employees in diabetes care and management, for diabetes care in schools, for possession and use of diabetes medication and monitoring equipment, for liability, for coordinating, supervising or educating not considered delegation and for diabetes care in nonpublic schools.

We are starting this petition to help spread the word about keeping our diabetic children safe in school. This is a direct result of my personal struggles with our school system. Our daughter was diagnosed as Type 1 when she was only 18 months old. It has been a 13 year struggle of ups and downs, worry and stress as we make sure to keep our child safe and alive. There was no bigger fear in life then when after the first 4 years, we had to trust others to keep her alive. Our daughter is a very brittle type 1. I swear I think when she looks at food her glucose level changes. We have met many parents of Type 1 kids and have heard many different experiences. But I know our daughter and for her to attend kindergarten, she needed someone to monitor her at all times. In our school district she was the first kindergarten diabetic child. We learned about 504’s, what schools are required to do (and painfully don’t do), what our child’s rights are and more. It pains us that 9 years later in the same school system, we feel as though we are educating them over and over again. We need to provide our schools with the resources to help! Please sign this petition!

More information can be found at facebook.com/groups/1716940195206900

House Bill 1625 states:
The care of a student with diabetes requires management 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. For students with Type I diabetes, and for some with Type 2 diabetes, that means monitoring blood glucose (sugar) levels through the day and the administration of insulin. Blood glucose levels that are well-managed help students avoid short-term complications of diabetes, and feel better and be more productive at school and at play. Most states allow for trained staff, in addition to a school nurse, to help with diabetes medications.

The legislation will amend the Public School Code to allow students who are capable of self-managing their diabetes to be permitted to do so. In addition, staff could be trained in the routine and emergency care needs of students who need assistance with their diabetes management, such as checking blood glucose, administering insulin or administering glucagon, when a school nurse is not available. Furthermore, the Department of Health would be required to issue diabetes management guidelines and training modules for schools.

The American Diabetes Association and health care professionals specializing in diabetes endorse training school personnel to provide this care (when a school nurse is not available) as the best--and safest—solution. The legislation makes it explicit that this is not a school nurse delegation and that permission for the use of a trained staff person would be provided by the parent and child's clinician.

I hope you will join in co-sponsoring this important legislation to ensure the safety of diabetic students in the absence of a school nurse.



Today: Percy is counting on you

Percy Dieffenbach needs your help with “Matthew Baker, Louise Bishop, Tina Davis, Thomas Murt, David Millard, Judy Ward, Katharine Watson, Kristin Hill, Dom Costa, Jeff Wheeland, Michael Driscoll, Mark Rozzi, James Roebuck, Daniel McNeil...: Keep our diabetic children safe in schools! Suppor...”. Join Percy and 233 supporters today.