Statue of Snips the dog in Lincoln's Cornhill Quarter

Statue of Snips the dog in Lincoln's Cornhill Quarter

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Brant Clayton started this petition to Lincoln City Council

When nobody would buy his Sealyham Terrier pup, enterprising market trader Henry Tyler began taking the dog to work and charging people a penny to stroke him whilst running his market stall within Lincoln's Cornhill. Snips the dog became popular with passers-by, particularly children, and so Henry carried on doing this day after day, week after week and month after month. The pennies eventually began to grow into shillings and pound notes; which would all go towards local charities.

Throughout the course of the 1950s Snips the dog and his owner Henry raised more than £35,000 for a variety of local charities. This included helping the Great Flood Relief Fund which helped those impacted by a great tidal surge along the East Coast of Lincolnshire in the 1950s; as well helping to pay for annual giant tea parties for the city's pensioners.

Snips the dog became something of a legend in the city and was awarded a silver collar by the then Mayor of Lincoln which can still be seen to this day within the city's Guildhall. When Snips sadly passed away, because of his popularity his body was laid in state in the Cornhill. There is also currently a plaque to Snip's achievements within the Cornhill Quarter which was donated by local residents who funded the memorial; which is currently not located in a particularly prominent position.

Lincoln is notably lacking in statues compared to other city's and as such it is considered that a small statue to Snips the dog, located within the Cornhill Quarter, would be a fitting tribute to a local icon and a wonderful story of charity within the city. A statue similar to that of Greyfriars Bobby in Edinburgh would be perfect for the city and provide a focal point within the newly refurbished Cornhill Quarter.

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