Lift the ban on vaginas at Edinburgh Fringe Festival

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#LetFannyFly over Fringe Festival to raise awareness of incontinence. 

Despite being an issue that affects 1 in 3 women and 80% of new and expecting mums, incontinence - caused by weak pelvic floor muscles -  is still being largely overlooked in both the medical profession and in society. Why? Because the issue is still considered taboo and not enough women have access to advice and support as a result. 

Today, it’s clear that these taboos around incontinence women’s health still exist in abundance, even in spaces that actively pride themselves on encouraging freedom of expression. 

Edinburgh City Council and the organisers of Fringe Festival have prevented us from campaigning on the Royal Mile because they consider our blimp - Fanny, the inflatable vagina - and illustrations of vaginas adorning our original pop-up booth to be “not suitable” for display around Edinburgh.

So why did we want to sponsor the Fringe? We found that 49% of women in the UK admit to experiencing embarrassing bladder leaks as a result of a simple laugh. This means 420,000 women during the Fringe Festival alone will be affected by pelvic floor related issues, which despite the thousands of available comedy shows, is definitely no laughing matter.

We are committed to raising awareness about pelvic floor health and how it can lead to incontinence so we’re not giving up. 

Our beautifully crafted and loveable 19ft blimp, Fanny, is currently grounded and lonely in a field just outside Edinburgh. Join us in petitioning the Council to lift the ban and allow Fanny to fly and fulfil her destiny.

Fanny needs YOU! 

You can help us get Fanny soaring today by signing this petition and using the hashtag #LetFannyFly to spread the word.

Show her that we are not ashamed of female body parts or talking about women’s health issues, least of all at the largest and most celebrated arts festivals in the world.

Together we can well and truly bust these decade-old taboos and encourage women to seek advice and treatment before the need for surgery, reducing the burden on the NHS, which spends £223 Million every year on incontinence.